Leo Robin

Happening Now on Film

Happening Now on Television


 

The Kitty performed Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend on The Masked Singer

The Masked Singer is a reality singing competition television series on Fox. It features celebrities facing off against one another with one major twist: each singer is shrouded from head to toe in an elaborate costume, complete with full face mask to conceal his or her identity. Ken Jeong, Jenny McCarthy, Nicole Scherzinger and Robin Thicke serve on the panel and play detective, alongside host Nick Cannon. To access more details of this show and view the Kitty performing “Diamonds Are A Girl’s Best Friend” during “The Battle of The Sixes: The Final 6” on The Masked Singer, click on this image.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Fox Show Simpsons featured a parody of the song “Thanks for the Memory”

In episode 13 of season 31 of the Fox hit show the Simpsons, entitled Frinkcoin, which aired on February 23, 2020, Homer hangs out with the Frink. The Simpsons, an animated sitcom on the Fox Broadcasting Company, is a satirical depiction of working-class life, epitomized by the Simpson family. The show is set in the fictional town of Springfield and parodies American culture and society, television, and the human condition. “Thanks for the Currency” is a parody of the song “Thanks for the Memory,” composed by Ralph Rainger with lyrics by Leo Robin. To access more details of this episode including the performance of the song “Thanks for the Currency,” click on the image:

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Hulu’s True Crime Drama The Act Blends Reality and Fantasy Worlds — like Gulliver’s Travels Featuring the Song “Forever” 

The Act is a true crime drama web television series that premiered in eight parts on March 20, 2019, on Hulu. The first season is based on the real life of Gypsy Rose Blanchard and her mother, Dee Dee Blanchard, who was accused of abusing her daughter by fabricating illness and disabilities as a direct consequence of Munchausen syndrome by proxyJoey King portrayed Gypsy, while Patricia Arquette played her mother, Dee Dee Blanchard.  Disney like stories, princesses and fairy-tale ideals played a large role in Dee Dee and Gypsy’s lives. There is a scene where Gypsy watches the movie based on Jonathan Swift’s 18th century novel Gulliver’s Travels that contains the song “Forever,” composed by Ralph Rainger with lyrics by Leo Robin. To learn more about this story and view the scene with the song “Forever,” click on this image.

 

 
The Late Late Show with James Corden featuring Lin-Manuel Miranda and Emily Blunt singing classics
 
James Corden welcomes, on his show The Late Late Show with James Corden, the stars of “Mary Poppins Returns” to perform a musical-inspired Role Call, featuring Lin-Manuel Miranda and Emily Blunt singing classics from 22 musicals covering “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. To view this funny sketch and enjoy this wonderful music, click on the image:
 
 

Marvel’s
critically acclaimed melodrama Agent Carter
Marvel’s critically acclaimed melodrama Agent Carter, from season 2 episode 10, titled Hollywood Ending, aired Tuesday 9:00 PM Mar 01, 2016 on ABC with a memorable scene where Sousa and Peggy kiss that features the song “Oh, but I Do!,” a popular song written by Arthur Schwartz and Leo Robin. This standard was first introduced and performed by Dennis Morgan in the 1946 film The Time, the Place and the Girl. The recording used in the scene is by Margaret Whiting whose recording was a big hit that same year. It has since become a popular standard and has been recorded by many artists. To view this passionate scene, click on the Image:
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The award winning television show Glee features “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend”

The Fox musical comedy-drama television series Glee has become a bona fide cultural phenomenon since its debut. The hit show starred Melissa Benoist for her portrayal of Marley Rose and Alex Newell for playing the transgender student Unique Adams. The show has received prestigious honors and singlehandedly made glee clubs cool again. A memorable episode, the fifteenth, known as Girls (and Boys) on Film, during Season Four on the hit television show Glee features “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend,” originally made famous by Marilyn Monroe in 1953’s Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, with a clever injection of Madonna’s “Material Girl.” To view this scene of the wonderful performance by the Glee Club, click on the Image:

 

 

 

Happening Now on The Movie Scene


The Documentary Uprooted is a Cinematic Exploration of the Art Form of Jazz Through Movement

Uprooted, a documentary about the history of Jazz Dance from Transmission, LLC, is a cinematic exploration of the art form of jazz through movement. Jazz Dance, with its history rooted in enslaved peoples, is a metaphor for struggle, resistance and acceptance. The film highlights the diversity of its practitioners within an examination of American history; paying homage to its lineage, while celebrating its many re-interpretations and inspiring the dancer of tomorrow to keep the art form alive. Marilyn Monroe performs the song “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and song plays under montage of footage and interviews describing qualities of jazz dance.  To access more details of this film including the iconic performance by Marilyn with insightful analysis, click on the image:

 

All-female superhero team in Birds of Prey and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn

Birds of Prey and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn (“Birds of Prey”) is an upcoming American superhero film based on the DC Comics team Birds of Prey. Birds of Prey is named for DC Comics’ premiere all-female superhero team. The highly anticipated film features a scene that may look familiar because you’ve seen the sequence that inspired them, from Marilyn Monroe’s performance of the musical number “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend,” composed by Jule Styne with lyrics by Leo Robin, in 1953’s Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. Birds of Prey is scheduled to hit theaters on February 7, 2020. To access more details of this film including the film’s trailer, click on the image:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Variety reports Oscar-Winning Songwriter “Leo Robin Helped Usher In the Golden Age of Song in Film”

On September 30, 2019 Variety, the premier source of entertainment news, featured an article by Ray Trakin, titled, “Thanks for the Memory: How Leo Robin Helped Usher In the Golden Age of Song in Film.” In his crisp and inimitable style, Mr. Trakin tells about when Leo first came to Hollywood, “In 1928, Robin was recruited by Hollywood as a certified “hit-maker” at the dawn of the sound era, hired by Paramount Pictures, and paired with Richard Whiting […] for the studio’s first musical, “Innocents of Paris,” released in 1929, which also marked the American debut for French crooner Maurice Chevalier. Mr. Trakin credits Robin with helping turn Hollywood into what it is today with “his legacy (that) just happens to define the modern sound era of motion pictures.” To access more details about the article by Roy Trakin, click on the Image:

 

George Clooney’s satirical dark comedy “Catch-22” on Hulu

Catch-22 is a satirical dark comedy miniseries based on the novel of the same name by Joseph Heller. The series stars George Clooney, who is also an executive producer and director for two episodes. The events occur in the Mediterranean theatre of World War II. The film makers frequently select the music with lyrics written by Leo Robin for these period films. In this film is the popular wartime song “No Love, No Nothin’” performed by Rosemary Clooney, composed by Harry Warren with lyrics written by Leo Robin. To access more details of this film including a portion of a review from RollingStone about the music and see the scene with the song “No Love, No Nothin’,” click on the Image:

 

A Rainy Day in New York features Marilyn Monroe classic Bye Bye, Baby”

A Rainy Day in New York is a 2019 romantic comedy film written and directed by Woody Allen. It stars Timothée ChalametElle FanningSelena GomezJude LawDiego Luna, and Liev Schreiber. The film follows the romantic exploits of a young college student (Chalamet) on a weekend trip in his hometown of New York City, trying to further bond with his college girlfriend (Fanning) while she is in the city to interview a famous film director (Schreiber). A Rainy Day in New York features Marilyn Monroe classicBye Bye, Baby.” To find out more details about the film and view the scene in the film A Rainy Day in New York with the song “Bye Bye, Baby.”

 

James Kent’s period melodrama The Aftermath 

The Aftermath is a 2019 drama film starring Keira Knightley, directed by James Kent and written by Joe Shrapnel and Anna Waterhouse, based on the 2013 novel of the same name by Rhidian Brook. The Aftermath is set in postwar Germany in 1946. In the aftermath of World War II, a British colonel and his wife are assigned to live in Hamburg during the post-war reconstruction. In this period film, there were two songs chosen with lyrics written by Leo Robin including the popular song “No Love, No Nothin'” performed by Ella Mae Morse, composed by Harry Warren, and the jazz song “Hi-Ya Love”, composed by Ralph Rainger. To access more details of this film including a portion of a review from The Guardian about the setting of this period and see a couple of scenes with these songs, click on the Image:

 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

Woody Allen’s nostalgia-sodden romance “Cafe Society”

In Matias Bombal’s Hollywood, film critic Matias Antonio Bombal reviewed Woody Allen’s Cafe Society, a story taking place in the 1930s Hollywood. Matias Bombal praises that “the entire soundtrack is joyfully filled with the exquisite musical taste of Woody Allen.” He is particularly fond of the “scene with Ralph Rainger and Leo Robin’s 1934 song “June in January” (for) adding just the right support to finish the total effect of the moment. It occurs as Bobby gets to know Veronica one late evening in a jazz club in New York.” “June in January” is a popular song introduced in the 1934 movie Here Is My Heart by Bing Crosby. The Crosby recording, a number #1 hit on Brunswick Records, has since has become a popular standard, recorded by many artists. To access more details of this review by Matias Bombal of the movie Cafe Society, click on the Image:

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Andy Goddard’s drama thriller “A Kind of Murder”

In the Tribeca Film Review appearing in Variety, film critic Nick Schager reviewed A Kind of Murder,  an adaptation of acclaimed suspense author Patricia Highsmith’s 1954 novel The Blunderer, where he proclaims”Biel and Bennett fulfill their light/dark archetypes with relative aplomb, the latter seducing Walter by crooning ‘I Can’t Escape From You’ in a licentious subterranean jazz club.” “I Can’t Escape from You” is a song written by Leo Robin and Richard A. Whiting which was first introduced by Bing Crosby in the 1936 Paramount film Rhythm on the Range. To access the complete review by Nick Schager of the movie A Kind of Murder, click on the Image:

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Todd Haynes’ Academy Award-nominee Carol

In a recent review by Stephanie Zacharek, a film critic, she proclaims that “Ralph Rainger and Leo Robin’s sweet nectarine of a jazz standard “Easy Living” figures, in a glancing yet potent way, in (Academy Award-nominee) Carol…Even though the lyrics speak of contentment — “Living for you is easy living/It’s easy to live when you’re in love” — the melody has a wistful glow about it, a suggestion that while there’s no such thing as living easy, the dream of doing so is very real.” To view this poignant scenes and access the complete review by Stephanie Zacharek of the movie Carol and much more, click on the Image:

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John Crowley’s critically acclaimed Brooklyn

John Crowley’s critically acclaimed drama Brooklyn premiered at this year’s Sundance Film Festival and features a collection of recordings of Irish classics including “Zing a Little Zong,” a popular song written by Harry Warren and Leo Robin. This standard was first introduced and performed by Bing Crosby and Jane Wyman in the 1952 film Just for You. To access a review by Ken Hanke of the film Brooklyn and much more, click on the Image:

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