Leo Robin

Just Around the Corner

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Welcome to “Just around the Corner,” the place where Leo Robin and his music will be discussed with contemporary artists, music historians, authors and others. The name is inspired by “Love Is Just around the Corner,” a song that Leo wrote with music by Lew Gensler. It was introduced in the 1934 film Here is My Heart where it was first sung by Bing Crosby and Kitty Carlisle. The song has since become a favorite and has been recorded by many artists including crooners Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin, jazz pianist Earl Hines and pop singer Kenny Rodgers with the gospel group Take 6.

In the spirit of Leo’s song, this will be a place for all things interesting and surprising that are in some way connected with Leo Robin and his music. Remember, when you want to return to this ongoing conversation, go to LeoRobin.com and you will find us here — “Just around the Corner.”

 

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Saturday, April 29, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Willie Nelson! Today, we celebrate this icon who is a musician, singer, songwriter, author, poet, actor and activist. The critical success of the album Shotgun Willie (1973), combined with the critical and commercial success of Red Headed Stranger (1975) and Stardust (1978), made Nelson one of the most recognized artists in country music. He was one of the main figures of outlaw country, a subgenre of country music that developed in the late 1960s as a reaction to the conservative restrictions of the Nashville sound. Nelson has acted in over 30 films, co-authored several books. Nelson recorded songs written by songwriter Leo robin including the standard “Blue Hawaii,” from the Honeymoon in Vegas soundtrack. Nelson was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1993, and he received the Kennedy Center Honors in 1998. In 2011, Nelson was inducted to the National Agricultural Hall of Fame, for his labor in Farm Aid and other fund raisers to benefit farmers. In 2012, Nelson was honored during the 46th Annual Country Music Association Awards as the first recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award, which was also named after him. In 2015 Nelson won the Gershwin Prize, the lifetime award of the Library of Congress. He was included by Rolling Stone on its 100 Greatest Singers and 100 Greatest Guitarists lists. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Nelson singing the popular standard “Blue Hawaii.”

 

Wednesday, April 26, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Carol Burnett! Today, we celebrate this icon who was an actress, comedian, singer, and writer, whose career spans six decades of television and who is best known for her long-running TV variety show, The Carol Burnett Show, originally aired on CBS from 1967 to 1978. She has achieved success on stage, television, and film in varying genres including dramatic and comedy roles. With its vaudeville roots, The Carol Burnett Show was a variety show that combined comedy sketches with song and dance. The comedy sketches included film parodies and character pieces. Burnett created many memorable characters during the show’s run, and both she and the show won numerous Emmy and Golden Globe Awards. Burnett also appeared in specials with Julie Andrews, Dolly Parton, Beverly Sills, and others. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Carol Burnett and Julie Andrews in a musical comedy sketch singing a medley that includes “Hallelujah,” a song penned by lyricist Leo Robin, in a television special.

 

Tuesday, April 25, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Ella Fitzgerald! Today, we celebrate this icon who was a jazz singer and was recognized for her purity of tone, impeccable diction, phrasing and intonation, and a “horn-like” improvisational ability, particularly in her scat singing. She was often referred to as the First Lady of Song, Queen of Jazz and Lady Ella. Fitzgerald found early musical success with the Chick Webb Orchestra, performing across the country, but most often associated with the Savoy Ballroom in Harlem. Her musical collaborations with Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and The Ink Spots were some of her most notable acts outside of her solo career. Fitzgerald’s influence lived on through her fourteen Grammy Awards, National Medal of Arts, Presidential Medal of Freedom, and tributes in the form of stamps, music festivals, and theater namesakes. Fitzgerald recorded many songs penned by songwriter Leo Robin including “Easy Living,” “Hallelujah,” “Hooray for Love,” “It Was Written in the Stars,” “Thanks for the Memory” and “Vote for Mr. Rhythm.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Fitzgerald singing “Hooray for Love.”

 

 

Monday, April 24, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Barbara Streisand! Today, we celebrate this icon who was a singer, songwriter, actress, and filmmaker. Her career spanning six decades, she has become an icon in multiple fields of entertainment, which earned her recognition as Mother of All Contemporary Pop Divas or Queen of The Divas. Streisand is one of the best-selling music artists of all time, with more than 68.5 million albums in the United States and with a total of 145 million records sold worldwide. Streisand is the only recording artist to have a number-one album in each of the last six decades, having released 53 gold albums, 31 platinum albums, and 14 multi-platinum albums in the United States.

After beginning a successful recording career in the 1960s, Streisand ventured into film by the end of that decade. She starred in the critically acclaimed Funny Girl, for which she won the Academy Award and Golden Globe Award for Best Actress. Her other films include The Owl and the Pussycat, The Way We Were, and A Star Is Born, for which she received her second Academy Award, composing music for the love theme “Evergreen”, the first woman to be honored as a composer. With the release of Yentl in 1983, Streisand became the first woman to write, produce, direct, and star in a major studio film. The film won an Oscar for Best Score and a Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture Musical; Streisand received the Golden Globe Award for Best Director.

Streisand is among a small group of entertainers who have been honored with an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony Award, and is one of only two artists who have also won a Peabody. She has been recognized with two Academy Awards, ten Grammy Awards including the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award and the Grammy Legend Award, five Emmy Awards including one Daytime Emmy, a Special Tony Award, an American Film Institute award, a Kennedy Center Honors prize, four Peabody Awards, the Presidential Medal of Freedom and nine Golden Globes. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Streisand and Judy Garland singing a medley including “Hooray for Love,” written by Leo Robin and Harold Arlen, on the Judy Garland Show.

 

Sunday, April 23, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Shirley Temple! Today, we celebrate this icon who was an actress, singer, dancer, businesswoman and diplomat and who was Hollywood’s number one box-office star from 1935 to 1938. Shirley Temple began her film career in 1932 at age 3. Little Miss Marker, a 1934 musical comedy score written by the famous songwriting team Leo Robin and Ralph Rainger, was Temple’s first starring role in a major motion picture and was crucial to establishing her as a major film star. In 1934, she found international fame in Bright Eyes, a feature film designed specifically for her talents and she received a special Juvenile Academy Award in February 1935 for her outstanding contribution as a juvenile performer to motion pictures during 1934. Film hits such as Curly Top and Heidi followed year after year during the mid-to-late 1930s. As an adult, she was named United States ambassador to Ghana and to Czechoslovakia and also served as Chief of Protocol of the United States. Temple was the recipient of numerous awards and honors including the Kennedy Center Honors and a Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Shirley Temple singing “Laugh, You Son of a Gun” from Little Miss Marker.

 

Thursday, April 20, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary composer Nicholas Brodszky! Today, we celebrate this legend who was born in Odessa (now in Ukraine), to Hungarian parents, and he spoke Hungarian throughout his life. He spent many years studying and working in Rome, Vienna, Berlin and Budapest. In the 1920s he contributed songs to Viennese operettas and his first film was made in Vienna in 1930. He emigrated to the United States in 1934. He composed for many musical films including collaborations with lyricist Leo Robin to produce splendid scores for Small Town Girl (1953) and Latin Lovers (1953) where they wrote the Oscar nominated song “My Flaming Heart” in 1953. Brodszky had a string of Oscar-nominated hit songs including “Be My Love” in 1950, “Wonder Why” in 1951, “Because You’re Mine” in 1952 and “I’ll Never Stop Loving You” in 1955. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Bobby Van’s spectacular performance of singing and dancing to Leo Robin & Nicholas Brodszky’s song “Take Me to Broadway” from Small Town Girl.

 

 

Monday, April 17, 2017 We wish all Hawaiians a wonderful celebration of Hawaiian cultural traditions such as the hula during the Merrie Monarch Festival. On this special day, we would like to honor the legendary Teresa Bright for her great contribution to the arts! Today, we celebrate this legend who is a native-Hawaiian entertainer, vocalist and musician who plays ‘ukulele and guitar. Bright has been a Hawaii favorite for decades for her enchanting voice and renditions of traditional Hawaiian songs colored with a touch of jazz and blues. Her music is also popular in Japan as well as the United States mainland. Teresa Bright is a consummate artist whose music is often framed in visual terms. The albums Self Portrait and Painted Tradition derive their inspiration from the world of art, and her more recent, Lei Ana, depicts her music within a frame. In another, Ka Pilina, a collage of photos portrays the relationships of the songs. Thus a gallery, a retrospective of her music from the past decade, is both musically and visually a wonderful exhibit. Bright has recorded several Hawaiian songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “Blue Hawaii” and “In a Little Hula Heaven.”

The award-winning vocalist is universally recognized as one of Hawai’i top singers. The Hawai’i Academy of Recording Arts has awarded her its top Female Vocalist of the Year honor and she is a recipient of multiple Na Hoku Hanohano Awards. Bright has recorded many albums including Self Portrait, Painted Tradition, A Bright Hawaiian Christmas, Ka Pilina, Quiet Nights, A Christmas Season’s Delight, Lei Ana and A Gallery. Hers is a voice crystalline, sultry, ethereal, powerful, touched with jazz and a multitude of color. She also has a huge following in Japan, where she performs often and has released Quiet Girl and Crossing the Blue on the Pioneer Record label and Pretty Eyes, from the Amuse Entertainment label. Bright has written and recorded multiple commercial jingles for Max Factor, NTT Japan, Sapporo Beer, Toyota and Japan Airlines. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Bright singing “In a Little Hula Heaven.”

 

Sunday, April 16, 2017 Wishing you and your family a Happy Easter that is filled with many joyful blessings, love and happiness! Easter is a time for renewal and all about being grateful and for counting all of our many blessings! We remember Small Town Girl, a 1953 romantic comedy musical film directed by László Kardos and starring Jane Powell, Farley Granger and Ann Miller with music by Nicholas Brodszky and lyrics by Leo Robin and the dance numbers choreographed by the legendary Busby Berkeley. There is a memorable scene with the church choir, where Jane Powell & ensemble sing the “Lullaby Of The Lord.” On this special day of renewal, for your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Jane Powell & ensemble performing the faithful “The Lullaby Of The Lord” from Small Town Girl.

 

Sunday, April 16. 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Bobby Vinton! Today, we celebrate this icon who is a singer and songwriter. Born in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, in pop music circles, he became known as “The Polish Prince of Poch”, as his music pays tribute to his Polish heritage. Known for his angelic voice and singing sincere songs about undying love, Vinton generated 30 Top 40 songs in the 1960s and 1970s, and 24 of his albums made the Billboard Top 200. After topping the charts with “Roses Are Red” in 1962, he reached the top position again in 1963 with his version of romantic love songs “Blue Velvet” and “There! I Said It Again.” In 1964, he topped the Hit Parade with “Mr. Lonely,” a song he co-wrote with Gene Allen that became his personal favorite. As a result of his success, Vinton said goodbye to his band and remained a solo act. Vinton continued to stay on the charts with songs such as “Please Love Me Forever” in 1967 and “I Love How You Love Me,” which made Number One in 1969. Vinton recorded songs written by fellow Pennsylvanian songwriter Leo robin including the standard “Blue Hawaii.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Vinton singing the popular standard “Blue Hawaii.”

 

Sunday, April 16, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Henry Mancini! Today, we celebrate this icon who was a composer, conductor and arranger who is best remembered for his film and television scores. His best known works include the jazz-idiom theme, “The Pink Panther Theme”, to The Pink Panther film series, his “Moon River” to Breakfast at Tiffany’s, and the theme to the Peter Gunn television series. The Peter Gunn theme won the first Grammy Award for Album of the Year. Mancini also had a long collaboration on film scores with the film director Blake Edwards. Mancini recorded many songs written by songwriter Leo robin including “Blue Hawaii,” “It’s June in January” and “Thanks for the Memory”  —  just to name a few. Often cited as one of the greatest composers in the history of film, he won four Academy Awards, a Golden Globe, and twenty Grammy Awards, plus a posthumous Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1995. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Mancini performing a beautiful instrumental of “Blue Hawaii.”

 

 

Wednesday, April 12, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Ann Miller! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a dancer, singer and actress. She is best remembered for her work in the Classical Hollywood musical films of the 1940s and 1950s. Miller was famed for her speed in tap dancing. She hit her mark in Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer musicals such as Easter Parade (1948), On the Town (1949) and Kiss Me Kate (1953) and in movies with scores written by songwriter Leo Robin with memorable songs including Two Tickets to Broadway (1951) (“Let the Worry Bird Worry for You”), Small Town Girl  (1953) (“I’ve Gotta Hear That Beat” and “My Gaucho”) and Hit the Deck (1955 ( “Hallelujah” and “Why, Oh, Why?”). In later life, Miller claimed to have invented pantyhose in the 1940s as a solution to the continual problem of tearing stockings during the filming of dance production numbers. The common practice had been to sew hosiery to briefs. If torn, the entire garment had to be removed and resewn with a new pair. Miller asked a hosiery maker to produce a single combined garment. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of a famous scene from Small Town Girl of Ann Miller’s spectacular performance of singing and dancing Leo Robin & Nicholas Brodszky’s song “I’ve Gotta Hear That Beat.”

 

 

Wednesday, April 12, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Eleanore Whitney! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a film actress and dancer. At the age of 10, she began studying dance under Bill Robinson and performed in vaudeville with Jack Benny and Rudy Vallee. In a 1937 edition of Modern Screen magazine it was reported that she broke the World Record for the fastest tap-dancing: 60 taps in four seconds. She was cast in a number of motion pictures in the 1930s, many of them musical-comedies, best known were for Timothy’s Quest (1936), Rose Bowl (1936) and Three Cheers for Love (1936). Lyricist Leo Robin wrote the score for Three Cheers for Love which includes the tap dancing number “Swing Tap.” She had a role in a series of musical comedy films with stars George Burns and his wife, Gracie Allen with scores penned by Leo Robin including The Big Broadcast of 1936 (1935), The Big Broadcast of 1937 (1936) and College Holiday (1936), (the latter two films also starred Jack Benny). Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of a scene with Whitney and a Leo Robin bouncy number “Rhyme for Love” in College Holiday.

 

Wednesday, April 12, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary singer Helen Forrest! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a singer of traditional pop and swing. She served as the “girl singer” for three of the most popular big bands of the Swing Era (Artie Shaw, Benny Goodman, and Harry James), thereby earning a reputation as “the voice of the name bands.” When she was singing with the Artie Shaw band, she recorded several songs of songwriter Leo Robin including “I Have Eyes” and “You’re a Sweet Little Headache.” The lyrics to this later song are sassy with “I have a good mind to spank you than to thank you for all the things you’ve done.” Forrest left Harry James in late 1943 in pursuit of a solo career. She signed a recording contract with Decca and co-starred with Dick Haymes on a CBS radio show from 1944 to 1947. At this time, she recorded more songs with lyrics by Leo Robin including “In Love in Vain” with Dick Haymes and “My Ideal” in 1950 in New York City with Carmen Dragon and his orchestra. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Helen Forrest and Artie Shaw Orchestra recording of “You’re a Sweet Little Headache.”

 

Sunday, April 9, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Paul Robeson! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a celebrated singer, actor, athlete and activist. Robeson attended Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J., where he was an All-America football player. Upon graduating from Rutgers at the head of his class, he rejected a career as a professional athlete and instead entered Columbia University and obtained a law degree in 1923. However, because of the lack of opportunity in the legal profession due to racial strife, he drifted to the stage, making a London debut in 1922. He joined the Provincetown Players, a New York theatre group that included playwright Eugene O’Neill, and appeared in O’Neill’s play All God’s Chillun Got Wings in 1924. His subsequent appearance in the title role of O’Neill’s The Emperor Jones caused a sensation in New York City (1924) and London (1925). He also starred in the film version of the play (1933).

In addition to his other talents, Robeson had a superb bass-baritone singing voice. In 1925 he gave his first vocal recital of spirituals in Greenwich Village, New York City, and he became world famous as Joe in the musical play Show Boat with his version of “Ol’ Man River.” His characterization of the title role in Othello in London (1930) won high praise, as did the Broadway production (1943), which set an all-time record run for a Shakespearean play on Broadway. Robeson appeared in a number of films including Sanders of the River (1935), Show Boat (1936), Song of Freedom (1936), and The Proud Valley (1940). In the final tale of the Tales of Manhattan, a 1942 anthology film, Robeson starred and sang the high-spirited song “Glory Day,” written by the famous songwriting team of Leo Robin & Ralph Rainger. His autobiography, Here I Stand, was published in 1958. For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of a scene from the film Tales of Manhattan with Robeson singing “Glory Day.”

 

 

Saturday, April 8, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Sonja Henie! Today, we celebrate this legend who was born in Kristiania, currently Oslo, and who was a Norwegian figure skater and film star. Henie won more Olympic and World titles than any other ladies’ figure skater including a three-time Olympic Champion in Ladies’ Singles, a ten-time World Champion and a six-time European Champion. After the 1936 World Figure Skating Championships, Henie gave up her amateur status and took up a career as a professional performer in acting and live shows. While still a girl, Henie had decided that she wanted to move to Hollywood and become a movie star when her competitive days were over, without considering that her thick accent might hinder her acting ambitions. After the success of her first film, One in a Million, Hollywood studio Chief Darryl Zanuck signed her to a long term contract at Twentieth Century-Fox and she starred in many skating themed movies including Wintertime, a 1943 musical film with a dazzling score written by Leo Robin and Nacio Herb Brown with lively dancing numbers including “Dancing in the Dawn,” “I Like It Here,” “Later Tonight” and “Wintertime.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory. For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Sonja Henie who is as graceful on the dance floor as she is on ice in this number from Wintertime — “Later Tonight.”

 

Saturday, April 8, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Carmen McRae! Today, we celebrate this icon who was a jazz singer, composer, pianist and actress and who was recognized for her behind-the-beat phrasing and her ironic interpretations of song lyrics that made her memorable and considered one of the most influential jazz vocalists of the 20th century. McRae sang in jazz clubs throughout the United States and across the world for more than fifty years. McRae drew inspiration from Billie Holiday and considered Holiday to be her primary influence but established her own distinctive voice. She went on to record more than 60 albums, enjoying a rich musical career, performing and recording in the United States, Europe, Canada and Japan. McRae recorded many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “Easy Living,” “I Can’t Escape from You,” “Miss Brown to You,” “In Love in Vain” and “If I Should Lose You” — just to name a handful. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of McRae singing “I Can’t Escape from You.”

 

Friday, April 7, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Billie Holiday! Today, we celebrate this icon who was a jazz singer and songwriter and who is recognized for her vocal delivery and improvisational skills. With a career spanning nearly thirty years, her vocal style, strongly inspired by jazz instrumentalists, pioneered a new way of manipulating phrasing and tempo. Nicknamed “Lady Day” by her friend and music partner Lester Young, Holiday had a seminal influence on jazz music and pop singing. Holiday is the recipient of four Grammy awards, all of them posthumous awards for Best Historical Album and she was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1973. Lady Sings the Blues, a film about her life, starring Diana Ross, was released in 1972 and she is the primary character in the play and later film Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill. Holiday recorded many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “Easy Living,” “Havin’ Myself a Time” and “Miss Brown to You” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Holiday singing “Havin’ Myself a Time.”

 

Thursday, April 6, 2017 One hundred and twenty-two years ago today, famed lyricist Leo Robin was born. He moved to Hollywood and created some of the most memorable film scores from the era where Leo Robin, known as “The Dean of Lyricists in Hollywood,” wrote songs for movie stars including Betty Grable, Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Carmen Miranda, Cary Grant, Dorothy Lamour, Gary Cooper, Marilyn Monroe, Marlene Dietrich, Shirley Temple and W. C. Fields. Leo Robin penned numerous songs of The Great American Songbook — “Thanks for the Memory,” “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend,” “Easy Living,” “Blue Hawaii,” “If I Should Lose You,” “Prisoner of Love” and “Beyond the Blue Horizon” — just to name seven. The songs of Leo Robin were recorded by legendary stars including the Queen Ella Fitzgerald, jazz singer Billie Holiday, pianist Bill Evans, crooners including Bobby Darin, Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra and Johnny Mercer and icons the likes of Elvis Presley, Etta James, James Brown and Judy Garland. Leo Robin’s songs are celebrated time and again with contemporary covers by pop icons such as Ariana Grande, Beyoncé, Diana Krall, Kylie Minogue, Madonna, Michael Bublé, Michael Feinstein, Nicole Kidman, Nicole Scherzinger, Norah Jones, Rod Stewart and Tony Bennett. The timeless music of Leo Robin is featured in recently released films including “Easy Living” in Carol, “I Can’t Escape from You” in A Kind of Murder,” “It’s June in January” in Woody Allen’s Cafe Society and “Zing a Little Zong” in Brooklyn. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Leo Robin singing his own song, “Love in Bloom” at the famous concert known as the “Carousel of American Music,” a once-in-a-lifetime concert held at the Golden Gate International Exposition on Sept. 24, 1940 that gathered the top American songwriters of the day to perform their own compositions.

 

Monday, April 3, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Doris Day! Today, we celebrate this icon who was an actress, singer and continuing animal welfare activist. Day began her career as a big band singer in 1939 and her popularity began to rise after her first hit recording “Sentimental Journey” in 1945. She recorded more than 650 recordings and became one of the most popular and acclaimed singers of the 20th century. She received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award and a Legend Award from the Society of Singers. Day recorded many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “In Love in Vain,” “Lost in Loveliness” and “Oh, but I Do!” — just to name a few.

In 1948, Day made her debut in film in Romance on the High Seas, which led to a 20-year career in film. She became well known for her string of musicals with Gordon MacRae in the early 1950s, and later, romantic comedies with handsome leading men such as James Stewart in The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956), Clark Gable in Teacher’s Pet (1958), Rock Hudson in Pillow Talk (1959), Lover Come Back (1961) and Send Me No Flowers (1964), Cary Grant in That Touch of Mink (1962), and James Garner in The Thrill of It All and Move Over, Darling (1963). Ranked as the biggest box-office star, Day received an Academy Award nomination for her performance in Pillow Talk, won three Henrietta Awards (World Film Favorite) and received the Los Angeles Film Critics Association’s Career Achievement Award. In 1989, she received the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement in motion pictures.

Her strong commitment to animal welfare began in 1971, when she co-founded Actors and Others for Animals. She started her own non-profit organization in the 1970s, the Doris Day Animal Foundation and, later, the Doris Day Animal League (DDAL). Establishing the annual observance Spay Day USA in 1995, the Doris Day Animal League now partners with The Humane Society of the United States and continues to be a leading advocacy organization. In 2004, she received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President George W. Bush in recognition of her distinguished service to the country. Day is retired from acting and performing, but has continued her work in animal rights and welfare causes. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Day singing “In Love in Vain.”

 

 

 

Saturday, April 1, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Jane Powell! Today, we celebrate this icon who was a singer, dancer and actress. Powell rose to fame during her childhood as a singer in her hometown of Portland, Oregon, and signed to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer while still in her teens. Once there, the studio used her vocal, dancing, and acting talents, casting her in such musicals as A Date with Judy (1948) with friend Elizabeth Taylor, Royal Wedding (1951) with Fred Astaire and Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954) with Howard Keel. She starred in musical films with scores written by songwriter Leo Robin with memorable songs including Small Town Girl (1953) (“The Lullaby of the Lord”) and Hit The Deck (1955) (“Hallelujah,” “Lucky Bird” and “Why, Oh, Why?”).  In 1957, she starred in the television musical production Ruggles of Red Gap with a score by Leo Robin with memorable songs — “I’m in Pursuit of Happiness” and “Ride on a Rainbow.” She recorded many popular standards penned by Leo Robin including “For Every Man There’s a Woman,” “Hooray for Love” and “In Love in Vain.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Jane Powell singing “Lucky Bird”  from Hit The Deck.

 

 

Saturday, April 1, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Debbie Reynolds! Today, we celebrate this icon who was an actress, singer, businesswoman, film historian, and humanitarian and who will always be remembered for her first leading role in 1952 at age 19, as Kathy Selden in Singin’ in the Rain. Her breakout role came in the portrayal of Helen Kane in the 1950 film Three Little Words, for which she was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Most Promising Newcomer. Her other successes include The Affairs of Dobie Gillis (1953), Susan Slept Here (1954), Bundle of Joy (1956 Golden Globe nomination), The Catered Affair (1956 National Board of Review Best Supporting Actress Winner), and Tammy and the Bachelor (1957), in which her performance of the song “Tammy” reached number one on the Billboard music charts. In 1959, she released her first pop music album, entitled Debbie. She starred in How the West Was Won (1963), and The Unsinkable Molly Brown (1964), a biographical film about the famously boisterous Molly Brown. Her performance as Brown earned her a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Actress. She starred in Hit The Deck, a 1955 musical with a dazzling score written by Leo Robin, Clifford Grey and Vincent Youmans, featuring dance numbers including “Hallelujah,” “Join the Navy,” “Loo Loo” and “Why, Oh, Why?” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Reynolds singing and dancing in a medley including “Join the Navy” and “Loo Loo” in Hit The Deck.

 

Thursday, March 30, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Norah Jones! Today, we celebrate this icon who is a singer, songwriter and actress. In 2002, Jones launched her solo music career with the release of Come Away with Me, a commercially successful and critically acclaimed album that was a fusion of jazz with country music and pop. It was certified diamond, selling over 26 million copies. The record earned Jones five Grammy Awards, including the Album of the Year. Record of the Year, and Best New Artist. Her subsequent studio albums Feels Like Home released in 2004, Not Too Late in 2007, and The Fall in 2009, all gained Platinum status, selling over a million copies each. Jones’ fifth studio album, Little Broken Hearts, was released in 2012, and her most recent, sixth studio album, Day Breaks, was released on October 7, 2016. Norah Jones recorded the popular standard penned by Songwriter Leo Robin — “Easy Living.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Norah Jones singing the jazz standard “Easy Living.”

 

Wednesday, March 29, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary songwriter Albert Von Tilzer! Today, we celebrate this top Tin Pan Alley songwriter legend who wrote the music to many hit songs and who will always be remembered for his music to “Take Me Out to the Ball Game.” The year 1908 would prove to be a turning point for him as a composer, and within a decade his work would permanently be embedded in the Great American Songbook with lyrics by Jack Norworth, the simple waltz song Take Me Out to the Ball Game soon became a national sensation. The irony is that neither composer had ever been to a ball game, and would not for at least two more decades. Early in songwriter Leo Robin’s career, Albert Von Tilzer, a well-known composer, who was also working with The Greenwich Village Follies, bumped into Leo and asked: “Are you working on anything new?” Leo reached into his pocket and pulled out the words for “My Cutie’s Due at Two-to-Two Today.” Albert said, “That’s cute” and became the composer for Leo’s first big song. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Bobby Darin & Johnny Mercer singing “My Cutey’s Due at Two-to-Two Today.”

 

 

 

Wednesday, March 29, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Megan Hilty! Today, we celebrate this legend who is an actress and singer. She rose to prominence for her roles in Broadway musicals including her performance as Glinda the Good Witch in Wicked, Doralee Rhodes in 9 to 5: The Musical and her Tony Award-nominated role as Brooke Ashton in Noises Off. She also starred as Ivy Lynn on the musical-drama series Smash and portrayed Liz on the sitcom Sean Saves the World. In May 2012, Hilty appeared in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, as a part of the Encores! staged concert series and she received rave reviews for her performance. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Hilty and cast singing a medley of songs from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.  

 

 

 

Tuesday, March 28, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Lady Gaga! Today, we celebrate this icon who is a singer, songwriter and actress. Her debut album The Fame (2008) was a critical and commercial success that produced international chart-topping singles such as “Just Dance” and “Poker Face.” A follow-up EP, The Fame Monster (2009), was met with a similar reception and “Bad Romance,” “Telephone,” and “Alejandro” were released, becoming successful singles. Her second full-length album Born This Way was released in 2011, topping the charts in more than 20 countries, including the United States, where it sold over one million copies in its first week. The album produced the number-one single “Born This Way.” Her third album Artpop, released in 2013, topped the US charts and included the successful single “Applause.”

In 2014, Gaga released Cheek to Cheek, a collaborative jazz album with Tony Bennett, who has recorded many popular standards penned by Songwriter Leo Robin, which became her third consecutive number one in the United States. Her fifth studio album Joanne (2016) topped the nation’s charts. With global album and single sales of 27 million and 146 million respectively, she is one of the best-selling musicians of all time and she has six Grammy Awards. She is also the first artist to win the Songwriters Hall of Fame’s Contemporary Icon Award. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Lady Gaga with a big beautiful umbrella in her unrelentingly edgy image along with Rita Hayworth performing Leo Robin’s “Me and My Fella and a Big Umbrella” in the 1942 film My Gal Sal in this umbrella themed video.

 

 

 

Saturday, March 25, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Richard Myers! Today, we celebrate this legend who was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and was a Broadway and film composer. When fellow Pennsylvanian Leo Robin was starting off, Robin and Myers co-wrote “Whistle Away Your Blues,” which was used in the Greenwich Village Follies (1925) and was then published as sheet music in 1926. They would work together again on many Broadway shows including By the Way (1925) where they wrote “Looking Around,” Bubbling Over (1926), Allez-Oop! and Hello Yourself (1928). Myers would continue to collaborate with lyricist Leo Robin on many film works including College Holiday, Lulubelle, Peg o’ Mine, The Night Hostess, Southern jubilee song and Something in the Wind. Together with  Jack Lawrence, Myers wrote  “Hold My Hand,” which was nominated for the 1954 Academy Award for Best Song. Perhaps the most memorable film was in 1929 when Myers wrote the music and Leo Robin wrote the lyrics in a collaboration on the first all-musical film, ”Syncopation,” with the theme song “Jericho,” introduced by Fredrick Waring and his Pennsylvanians.  Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of a scene from Syncopation of Fredrick Waring and his Pennsylvanians performing “Jericho.”

 

 

Wednesday, March 22, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic George Benson! Today, we celebrate this icon who is a musician, guitarist and singer-songwriter and who is one of the greatest jazz guitarists of all time. He began his professional career at 21 as a jazz guitarist. He is known as well for his vocal work, which features his light yet expressive singing voice, as for his guitar skills. His breakthrough success was the album Breezin’ with the album being certified triple Platinum by the RIAA. Breezin’ topped the Pop, Jazz and R&B album charts in Billboard in 1976 and spun off two hit singles, “This Masquerade,” which was a top ten pop and R&B hit and the title song, which has become a smooth jazz standard. Benson recorded the jazz standard “Easy Living,” penned by a fellow Pittsburgh, Pennsylvanian, Leo Robin. Benson is a ten-time Grammy winner including multiple awards for the album Breezin’. He has received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Benson skillfully playing an instrumental on his guitar of “Easy Living.”

 

 

Friday, March 17, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Nat King Cole! Today, we celebrate this icon who was a singer who first came to prominence as a leading jazz pianist. He was widely noted for his soft baritone voice, performing in big band and jazz genres, and was a major force in popular music for three decades. Cole hosted a national television variety show, The Nat King Cole Show and he acquired his nickname, “King”, performing at one jazz club, a nickname presumably reinforced by the otherwise unrelated nursery rhyme about Old King Cole. Cole recorded many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “If I Should Lose You” and “My Flaming Heart.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Nat King Cole passionately singing the Oscar-nominated Best Original Song “My Flaming Heart” when he introduced it in Small Town Girl.

 

Thursday, March 16, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Jerry Lewis! Today, we celebrate this icon who was a comedian, actor, singer, film producer, film director, screenwriter and humanitarian. He is known for his slapstick humor in film, television, stage and radio. He will always be known for being the man who performed zany antics with Dean Martin who served as the straight man of the exceptional comedy team “Martin and Lewis.” The performers were different from most other comedy acts of the time because they relied on their interaction instead of planned skits. Following that success, he was a solo star in film, nightclubs, television, concert stages and musicals. Lewis served as national chairman of the Muscular Dystrophy Association and host of the live Labor Day broadcast of the Jerry Lewis MDA Telethon for 40 years. Lewis has received several awards for lifetime achievements from the American Comedy Awards, Los Angeles Film Critics Association, Venice Film Festival, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and been honored with two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Lewis recorded songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including crooning and comedic like the songs “Bye Bye, Baby” and “Louise.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of “Martin and Lewis” in the 1952 film The Stooge with Lewis doing an impression of Maurice Chevalier singing a Leo Robin song “Louise” and Dino singing “Louise” at a nightclub.

 

Tuesday, March 14, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Quincy Jones, Jr.! Today, we celebrate this icon, also known as “Q”, who is a record producer, conductor, arranger, composer, musician, television producer, film producer, instrumentalist, magazine founder, entertainment company executive and humanitarian. His career spans six decades in the entertainment industry and a record 79 Grammy Award nominations, and 28 Grammys, including a Grammy Legend Award in 1991. Quincy came to prominence in the 1950s as a jazz arranger and conductor, before moving on to work prolifically in pop music and film scores. Among his awards, Quincy was named by Time Magazine as one of the most influential jazz musicians of the 20th century Quincy recorded many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “Easy Living,” “If I Should Lose You” and “What’s Good about Goodbye?” — just to name a few. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment in the studio of Frank Sinatra with Quincy Jones & Orchestra performing “If I Should Lose You.”

 

 

Sunday, March 12, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic singer Liza Minnelli! Today, we celebrate this icon who is an actress and singer. With a career spanning six decades, she has reached legendary status in multiple fields of entertainment and is among a small group of entertainers who have been honored with an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony Award. Liza appeared in perhaps her best-known film role, as Sally Bowles in the movie version of Cabaret (1972). The daughter of film actress and singer Judy Garland and film director Vincente Minnelli she began her career as a teenager in New York City as a musical theatre actress and nightclub performer. She also regularly performed with her famous mother, most notably in their 1964 joint engagement Live at the London Palladium and in Garland’s own CBS television series The Judy Garland Show. Liza recorded many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including — “For Every Man There’s a Woman” and “Hooray for Love.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Liza with her mother Garland performing a medley including “Hooray for Love” Live at the London Palladium.

 

 

Friday, March 10, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Carrie Underwood! Today, we celebrate this pop icon who is one of the most awarded singers in any genre of music and who has built a stellar career on cinematic songs that pack an emotional wallop, from her first chart-topper “Jesus, Take the Wheel” to more recent No. 1 smashes such as “Blown Away,” “Two Black Cadillacs,” “Something in the Water,” and “Little Toy Guns.” Since winning American Idol in 2005, Underwood has sold 58 million records worldwide, scored 21 No. 1 hits (including 11 she co-wrote), and earned over 100 major awards. She was the first female artist to be twice named the Academy of Country Music’s Entertainer of the Year. A respected member of the Grand Ole Opry, Underwood has tallied 38 weeks at No. 1 on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart with songs that have been streamed more than 1.5 billion times worldwide. In addition to her impressive recording career, Underwood branched out into acting with roles in film and television, including starring as Maria von Trapp in NBC’s Emmy®-winning The Sound of Music Live!, which attracted 44 million viewers. She has also launched her own fitness lifestyle line, CALIA by Carrie Underwood, which made a splash during New York Fashion Week 2015.

The Checotah, Oklahoma native’s four previous studio albums – Some Hearts, Carnival Ride, Play On, and Blown Away – have each been certified Platinum or multi-Platinum, and all have been named Country Album of the Year at the American Music Awards. In 2014, Underwood released her first hits collection, Greatest Hits: Decade #1. Storyteller has already continued that momentum with the record-breaking success of the hit first single, “Smoke Break.” “‘Smoke Break’ is all about the overworked, the tired, the people that just run to catch up,” Underwood says. “‘Smoke Break’ is about taking a step away for just a minute and being able to clear your head and collect your thoughts. We were very careful when we wrote it in wanting to make sure people understood the metaphor. That’s why we said, ‘I don’t smoke, but sometimes I need a smoke break. I don’t drink, but sometimes I need a stiff drink.’ It’s more about finding those things that take you away, whether that’s your coffee break or a glass of wine at night or your exercise or chatting with your mom. It’s that thing that is just for you, and it’s a release.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Underwood & other songstresses wearing lip rouge to songwriter Leo Robin’s “Gather Lip Rouge while You May.”

 

 

Friday, March 10, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Marion Hutton! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a singer and actress. She is best remembered for her singing with the Glenn Miller Orchestra from 1938-1942. She was the sister of actress/singer Betty Hutton. Hutton was discovered by Glenn Miller and was invited to join the Glenn Miller Orchestra in 1938. She recalls “I was only seventeen then […] and so Glenn and Helen [Miller] became my legal guardians. He was like a father because I never had a father I remembered.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Marion Hutton accompanied by the Glenn Miller Orchestra singing “Bluebirds in the Moonlight,” written by the famous songwriting team Leo Robin & Ralph Rainger for the 1939 animated film Gulliver’s Travels.

 

 

Monday, March 6, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Rochelle Hudson! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a film actress who appeared in popular films from the 1930s through the 1960s. Hudson was a WAMPAS Baby Star in 1931. She may be best remembered today for her early roles including costarring in Wild Boys of the Road (1933), playing Cosette in Les Misérables (1935), playing Mary Blair, the older sister of Shirley Temple’s character in Curly Top, and for playing Natalie Wood’s mother in Rebel Without a Cause (1955). During her peak years in the 1930s, notable roles for Hudson included Richard Cromwell’s love interest in the Will Rogers showcase Life Begins at 40 (1935), the daughter of carnival barker W.C. Fields in Poppy (1936) and Claudette Colbert’s adult daughter in Imitation of Life (1934). She also played Sally Glynn, the fallen ingénue to whom Mae West imparts the immortal wisdom, “When a girl goes wrong, men go right after her!” in the 1933 Paramount film, She Done Him Wrong. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of a scene with W. C. Fields playing an instrument & Rochelle Hudson singing “Rendezvous with a Dream,” penned by Leo Robin, from Poppy.

 

Friday, March 3, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary actress Charlotte Henry! Today, we celebrate this legend who was an actress who is best remembered for her roles in Alice in Wonderland (1933) and Babes in Toyland (1934). She also starred in the Frank Buck serial Jungle Menace (1937). A Paramount talent scout saw Charlotte in a play and arranged a screen test on a Monday morning. One-week-to-the-day later, Charlotte Henry began filming the high budget classic,  Alice in Wonderland. The studio’s press department made much of her uncanny resemblance to the character as it appeared in the original Tenniel drawings. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a scene of a memorable musical moment from the famous film Alice in Wonderland with a song of the same name sang by and with lyrics written by Leo Robin and music by Dimitri Tiomkin and Nat Finston.

 

Thursday, March 2, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Desi Arnaz! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a Cuban-born American musician, band leader, actor, television producer, writer, and director. He is best remembered for his role as Ricky Ricardo on the American television series sitcom I Love Lucy, starring with Lucille Ball, to whom he was married at the time. Arnaz was also internationally renowned for leading his Latin music band, the Desi Arnaz Orchestra. Ball and he are generally credited as the inventors of the rerun in connection with I Love Lucy. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Desi Arnaz singing a popular standard written by the songwriter Leo Robin — “A Rainy Night in Rio.”

 

 

Wednesday, March 1, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary band leader Glenn Miller! Today, we celebrate this legend who was an American big band musician, arranger, composer and bandleader in the swing era. He was the best-selling recording artist from 1939 to 1943, leading one of the best known big bands. Miller’s recordings include “In the Mood”, “Moonlight Serenade,” “Pennsylvania 6-5000,” “Chattanooga Choo Choo,” “A String of Pearls,” “At Last”, “(I’ve Got a Gal In) Kalamazoo,” “American Patrol,” “Tuxedo Junction,” “Elmer’s Tune,” and “Little Brown Jug. Miller recorded many songs written by songwriter Leo robin including “Bluebirds in the Moonlight,” “Faithful Forever,” “Hallelujah,” “It Was Written in the Stars,” and “My Ideal” — just to name a handful. In 1942, at the peak of his civilian career, Miller decided to join the war effort, in his own words, to “be placed in charge of a modernized Army band.” Miller initially formed a large marching band that was to be the core of a network of service orchestras followed by Miller’s weekly radio broadcast “I Sustain the Wings” where he once stated on radio: “America means freedom and there’s no expression of freedom quite so sincere as music.” While he was traveling to entertain U.S. troops in France during World War II, Miller went missing in action December 15, 1944 when his aircraft disappeared in bad weather over the English Channel. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Glenn Miller & His Orchestra performing “Hallelujah.”

 

 

Tuesday, February 28, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Dinah Shore! Today, we celebrate this icon who was a singer, actress, television personality and the top-charting female vocalist of the 1940s. She reached the height of her popularity as a recording artist during the Big Band era of the 1940s and 1950s when she covered songs of the Great American Songbook. Her work as a singer, she recorded such standards penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “A Rainy Night in Rio” “Hooray for Love,” “It Was Written in the Stars,” “So-o-o-o-o in Love,” “This Is the Moment” and What’s Good about Goodbye?” Dinah Shore went on to a four-decade career in television beginning in 1951 when she debuted her self-titled variety show that would be the first of several long-running shows including Dinah!, Dinah’s Place, and Dinah and Friends, that would make her one of the nation’s most popular TV personalities and for which she’d win nine Emmys, a Peabody Award and a Golden Globe. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Dinah Shore singing “A Rainy Night in Rio.”

 

Friday, February 24, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Barbara Lawrence! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a starlet from Hollywood’s Golden Age who later became a novelist, publicist and realtor. As a young girl, she was a model. While completing her studies at UCLA, she co-starred in half a dozen movies for 20th Century Fox. In 1951, she co-starred in the musical Two Tickets to Broadway, with a score written by Jule Styne and Leo Robin, where she sang a couple of numbers including “Let the Worry Bird Worry for You.” She appeared in the critically acclaimed A Letter to Three Wives (1949). In 1952, she was cast in Here Come the Nelsons (1952), which was the film version of their popular Radio program. The next year, Barbara was cast with Gig Young in Arena (1953), which was a 3-D feature film from MGM. As originally shown, special 3-D glasses were required to view the picture to bring all the action of the Rodeo to your seat. In 1955, she was cast as Gertie Cummings in the movie Oklahoma! (1955). Oklahoma! (1955) was filmed in TODD-AO wide screen and Barbara reprises the role she played on the stage. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Barbara Lawrence singin’ and dancin’ “Let the Worry Bird Worry for You” in Two Tickets to Broadway.

 

 

Thursday, February 23, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Norman Rae Taurog! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a film director and screenwriter, directing 180 films. At the age of 32, he received the Academy Award for Best Director for Skippy (1931),  becoming the youngest person ever to win the award, a record that still remains unbroken as of today. He was later nominated for Best Director for the film Boys Town (1938).  Songwriter Leo Robin worked with Taurog on a few films starring Bing Crosby including The Big Broadcast of 1936 (1935) and Rhythm on the Range (1936). Taurog directed six Martin and Lewis films including The Stooge where Jerry Lewis sings a comedic-romantic version of the song “Louise,” a song written by Leo Robin. For his great contribution to the motion picture industry, Taurog has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of a scene with the popular standard “Miss Brown to You” danced by Bill Robinson and The Nicholas Brothers from The Big Broadcast of 1936. 

 

 

Wednesday, February 22, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Nacio Herb Brown! He attended the Musical Arts High School in Los Angeles, California and graduated with a bachelor’s degree from UCLA. After college, Brown started his own tailoring business. A few years after that he then became a realtor accruing a small fortune in Beverly Hills real estate trading. However, none of these paths fit the creative composer and he began his finest career in songwriting in the early 1920’s. Today, we celebrate this legend who was a composer of popular music for films and Broadway with many of which have become a contribution to the Great American Songbook and who is best known for with the score and title song entitled “Singin’ in the Rain,” written with longtime partner, Arthur Freed. Brown also wrote a couple of musical scores with lyricist Leo Robin for the films Greenwich Village, starring Carmen Miranda, and Wintertime, starring Norwegian figure skater and film star Sonja Henie. For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Sonja Henie who is as graceful on the dance floor as she is on ice in this number from Wintertime — “Later Tonight.”

 

 

Monday, February 20, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary bandleader Richard Himber! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a bandleader, composer, violinist, magician and practical joker. Although he is now remembered primarily for his musical legacy, his contemporaries recall his incessant practical joking. Himber formed his first dance band in the early 30s in New York City, New York, having previously worked as a sideman with Rudy Vallee and as manager for Buddy Rogers’ Band. He had also been employed as a magician in vaudeville, and he would use his magic skills to embellish the band’s live act, giving them a distinctive edge over the competition. Throughout the 30s and 40s the Himber orchestra proved popular at the smaller New York hotels such as Essex House, the Hotel Pierre and the Ritz-Carlton, with a style that borrowed from both the sweet and swing traditions. The Richard Himber and his Orchestras  recorded a great many songs written by songwriter Leo robin including “Blossoms on Broadway,” “Blue Hawaii,” “Gather Lip Rouge while You May,” “If I Should Lose You,” “It’s June in January,” “Thunder over Paradise” and “With Every Breath I Take.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Richard Himber and his Orchestra performing “Blossoms on Broadway.”

 

Monday, February 20, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Rihanna! Today, we celebrate this icon who is a singer and a global pop star. Born on the Caribbean island of Barbados, as a teenager, she turned to singing as a release from her troubles at home. When Rihanna was only 16 years old, she left Barbados to move to America to pursue a singing career. Rihanna signed with Def Jam records at age 16 and in 2005 released her debut album Music of the Sun which sold more than two million copies worldwide. She went on to release more albums and an array of hit songs including “Unfaithful,” “Umbrella,” “Disturbia,” “Take a Bow,” “Diamonds” and “We Found Love.” With sales exceeding 200 million records worldwide, Rihanna is one of the best-selling artists of all time, earning fourteen number-one singles on the Billboard Hot 100 and winning eight Grammy Awards and twelve American Music Awards. She is also the first artist to win the inaugural Icon Award at the 2013 American Music Awards. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Rihanna performing her hit song “Umbrella” in her unrelentingly edgy image along with Rita Hayworth performing Leo Robin’s “Me and My Fella and a Big Umbrella” in the 1942 film My Gal Sal in this umbrella themed video.

 

 

Thursday, February 16, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Jimmy Wakely! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a country-western singer and actor and one of the last singing cowboys. Jimmy Wakely had many talents such as singing, songwriting, guitar-playing. He performed during the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s in many venues including radio, film, TV, rodeos, clubs and even had his own series of comic books. Jimmy’s country trio would warble for a number of top westerns stars in their film vehicles, known vicariously during their film stay as “Jimmy Wakely and his Rough Riders,” “The Jimmy Wakely Trio,” “Jimmy Wakely and his Saddle Pals” and “Jimmy Wakely and His Oklahoma Boys.” He starred in several Western movies with most of the major studios with his character heroes usually taking on his own name, Jimmy Wakely such as performances of country songs written by Leo Robin in films including playing guitar and singing “The Funny Old Hills” in Twilight on the Trail in 1941 and “Little Rose of the Rancho” in Trail To Mexico in 1946. His duet singles with Margaret Whiting during the post-war period produced a string of top  hits, on the US country charts and pop music charts including “Slipping Around,” “Broken Down Merry-Go-Round” and the Christmas classic “Silver Bells.” Wakely owned two music publishing companies and a record company in later years and performed at the Grand Ole Opry. Wakely was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1971 and the Western Music Association Hall of Fame in 1991. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a scene of a memorable musical moment of the Jimmy Wakely Trio playing on guitar and singing “Little Rose of the Rancho” in Trail To Mexico.

 

 

Wednesday, February 15, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Harold Arlen! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a composer of popular music, having written over 500 songs, a number of which have become a contribution to the Great American Songbook. He is perhaps best known for composing the score for the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz  with lyrics by E.Y. Harburg including the classic “Over the Rainbow. In 1929, Arlen composed his first well-known song “Get Happy” with lyrics by Ted Koehler and their partnership resulted in a number of hit songs including the familiar standards “Let’s Fall in Love” and “Stormy Weather.” Arlen wrote the musical score for the film Casbah with lyricist Leo Robin and Tony Martin introduced these songs all of which became popular standards including “For Every Man There’s a Woman,” “Hooray for Love,” “It Was Written in the Stars” and “What’s Good about Goodbye?” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Tony Martin singing “What’s Good about Goodbye?” from Casbah.

 

Tuesday, February 14, 2017 On the day of the hearts, may this Saint Valentine’s Day be filled with everlasting love, understanding and contentment as you journey through life with those you hold dear. On this special day people share unique, romantic gifts and cards with their loved ones. There is no Valentine’s Day card or gift that can perfectly say “how you fill my heart” to your valentine. We remember the musical that opened on Broadway The Girl in Pink Tights, a musical comedy with music by Sigmund Romberg and lyrics by Leo Robin and a musical book by Jerome Chodorov and Joseph Fields. In this show, there is a memorable song “My Heart Won’t Say Goodbye” — just one of hundreds of songs about love written by Leo Robin. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” If your Tony Bennett or have a voice like him, you can sing this song to your sweetheart or you can send your sweetie this recording by Tony Bennett — “My Heart Won’t Say Goodbye.”

 

Tuesday, February 14, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Jack Benny! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a comedian, vaudevillian, radio, television and film actor and violinist and recognized as a leading entertainer of the 20th century. Benny portrayed his character as a miser, playing his violin badly and, in character, he would claim to be 39 years of age, regardless of his actual age. Benny was known for comic timing and the ability to cause laughter with a pregnant pause or a single expression, such as his signature exasperated “Well!” His radio and television programs, popular from the 1930s to the 1970s, were a major influence on the sitcom genre. Starting in the Lucky Strike era, Benny adopted a medley of “Yankee Doodle Dandy” and “Love in Bloom” as his theme music, opening every show. “Love in Bloom,” penned by Leo Robin, was later the theme of his television show. Jack Benny starred in many films with musical scores written by lyricist Leo Robin including Artists and Models, Artists and Models Abroad, College Holiday, Man About Town and The Big Broadcast of 1937. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Jack Benny playing the violin to his theme song “Love in Bloom.”

 

Tuesday, February 14, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Jessica Dragonette! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a singer who became popular on radio and was active in the World War II effort. She began singing on radio in 1926, and during her 22-year radio career she helped to popularize operettas and semi-classical music. An admiring press dubbed her the “Princess of Song,” a nickname she later would use to publicize concert events. She was the star of the Philco Hour on NBC from 1927-30. She became the star of the Cities Service Concerts program, which she joined in 1930. By 1935, a listeners’ poll voted her radio’s most popular female vocalist.  In 1934, she provided the voice of Persephone in the Silly Symphony cartoon The Goddess of Spring. And in 1939, she provided the voice of “Princess Glory” in the full color animated motion picture Gulliver’s Travels, a score written by the songwriting team Leo Robin & Ralph Rainger who wrote many memorable songs for the film including “Faithful Forever” and “Bluebirds in the Moonlight.” During World War II, she performed for charities benefiting the U.S. armed services, earning her an honorary commission as a Colonel. She performed frequently for the troops and sold a record number of war bonds.  Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Jessica Dragonette singing “Bluebirds in the Moonlight” from Gulliver’s Travels.

 

Monday, February 13, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Louis DaPron! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a tap dancer, choreographer and dance instructor whose dazzling tap skills created some of the 1940s most energetic dance sequences, was born into a family of hoofers. Known as “The Ace of Taps” because of his almost unbelievable speed, DaPron won quick fame as a leading exponent of rhythm tap dancing. He began performing in vaudeville at the age of four, being taught by his father, who had studied with the Irish softshoe dancer George Primrose. While appearing as the featured dancer at the Trocadero nightclub in Hollywood, the twenty-two year old was signed by Paramount to partner Eleanor Whitney in musical films, in which he made his film debut, choreographing his own routine, in Three Cheers for Love, a 1936 musical film with a dazzling score written by the famous songwriting team of Leo Robin and Ralph Rainger. That led to a contract at Universal Studios where he became the dance master for its Jivin’ Jack and Jills musical series with dancing stars Donald O’Connor and Peggy Ryan. Working with O’Connor on a number films and television shows, DaPron supplied the sounds for O’Connor’s taps, either live off-camera or pre- or post-recorded. DaPron also staged musical scenes for Gower Champion, Perry Como, Doris Day, Vera-Ellen, Judy Garland, Mitzi Gaynor, Bob Hope, Ruby Keeler, Jerry Lewis, Ann-Margaret, Ann Miller, and Ginger Rogers. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Louis DaPron and Eleanor Whitney singing and dancing to “Swing Tap” in Three Cheers for Love.

 

Thursday, February 9, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Carmen Miranda! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a Portuguese-Brazilian samba singer, dancer, Broadway actress and film star. Her first albums soon made her a national star. Miranda’s career in Brazil as a singer of samba was established in the 1920s and 1930s, when she recorded gramophone records, performed regularly on the radio stations of Rio de Janeiro, and was featured in many of the first sound films or chanchadas made in Brazil and by the mid-1930s she had become the most popular female Brazilian singer. Miranda was encouraged by the United States government as part of President Roosevelt’s Good Neighbor policy so she was considered the goodwill ambassador and promoter of intercontinental culture designed to strengthen links with Latin America and Europe.

Nicknamed “The Brazilian Bombshell,” her exotic clothing and Latin accent became her trademark such as her signature fruit hat outfit she wore in her American films, particularly in 1943’s The Gang’s All Here, which had a musical score written by lyricist Leo Robin where Miranda sang in her signature style including ” The Lady in the Tutti Frutti Hat, ” “Paducah” and “You Discover You’re in New York.” In 1944 , Miranda starred in Greenwich Village, also a score written by Leo Robin, where she sang “Give Me a Band and a Bandana.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Miranda singing “Give Me a Band and a Bandana” in Greenwich Village.

 

Wednesday, February 8, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Jack Lemmon! Today, we celebrate this icon who was an actor and musician. Lemmon was an eight time Academy Award nominee, with two wins. He starred in over 60 films, such as Some Like It Hot, The Apartment, Mister Roberts (for which he won the 1955 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor), Days of Wine and Roses, The Great Race, Irma la Douce, The Odd Couple, Save the Tiger (for which he won the 1973 Academy Award for Best Actor), The Out-of-Towners, The China Syndrome, Missing (for which he won Best Actor at the 1982 Cannes Film Festival), Glengarry Glen Ross, Grumpy Old Men and Grumpier Old Men. Lemmon’s singing voice was first heard on two film soundtracks in 1955, Three for the Show with Betty Grable and My Sister Eileen, a score written by Jule Styne and Leo Robin. For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of a scene of Jack Lemmon, who puts the moves on co-star Betty Garrett, singing “It’s Bigger Than You and Me” from My Sister Eileen.

 

Wednesday, February 8, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Lana Turner! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a film and television actress and who was discovered while drinking soda at a diner counter at the Top Hat Cafe in Hollywood. She signed with MGM and became a celebrated film actress and one of America’s most celebrated sex symbols during the 1940s and 1950s. Turner made over 50 films including the musical Latin Lovers, a score written by Leo Robin and Nicolas Brodszky. Her tempestuous personal life—seven marriages, a stable of lovers and a very public murder scandal—only increased her reputation as a larger-than-life screen and sex goddess. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Lana Turner in a scene from Latin Lovers with co-star Ricardo Montalban singing “I Had to Kiss You.”

 

Friday, February 3, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary composer Newell Chase! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a composer, conductor, pianist and organist. He studied music with Whelpley, Goodrich, Converse, and Serly. He was a church organist and pianist, and also a dance orchestra leader. In 1924 he became assistant conductor at the Capitol Theatre in New York, and was solo pianist for the “Roxy Gang.” In 1928, he arrived in Hollywood as a composer and music adviser, scoring for silent films and for radio. His chief musical collaborators included Leo Robin, Richard Whiting and Sam Coslow. His popular song compositions with Robin and Whiting include the famous popular standard “My Ideal” and “It’s a Great Life If You Don’t Weaken” for the musical Playboy of Paris. He wrote with Robin and Coslow the score for The Vagabond King. Chase and Robin also wrote the song “Never Say Die” that was introduced in February 1929 in Behind the Make Up and was later that year, featured at the end of the early Talkartoon, Dizzy Dishes with the original appearance of the famous character Betty Boop taking some or all of her “boop-oop-a-doop” refrain from Leo Robin’s “I Have to Have You.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of “Never Say Die” from Behind the Make Up.

 

 

Tuesday, January 31, 2017 Happy Birthday to the theatre icon Carol Channing! Today, we celebrate this icon who is an actress, singer, dancer, comedian, voice artist and who will always be known for the 1949 musical Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, a score written by Jule Styne and Leo Robin, which starred Channing in the lead role of Lorelei Lee, which made her a star. Channing was nominated for her first Tony Award in 1956 for The Vamp and a second nomination came in 1961 for Show Girl. In 1964, she originated the role of Dolly Gallagher Levi in Hello, Dolly! and won the Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical. She received her fourth Tony Award nomination in 1974 for the musical Lorelei, a re-imagining of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. Channing was inducted to the American Theatre Hall of Fame in 1981 and received a Lifetime Achievement Tony Award in 1995. She also won the Golden Globe Award. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Carol Channing & Miss Piggy singing “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend.”

 

Sunday, January 29, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic W. C. Fields! Today, we celebrate this icon who was a comedian, actor, juggler and writer. Fields’ comic persona was a misanthropic and hard-drinking egotist who remained a sympathetic character despite his snarling contempt for dogs and children. Among his recognizable trademarks were his raspy drawl and grandiloquent vocabulary. His career in show business began in vaudeville, where he attained international success as a silent juggler. He gradually incorporated comedy into his act, and was a featured comedian in the Ziegfeld Follies for several years. He became a star in the Broadway musical comedy Poppy (1923), in which he played a colorful small-time con man. In 1936, Fields re-created his signature stage role in Poppy for Paramount Pictures. His subsequent stage and film roles were often similar scoundrels, or else henpecked everyman characters. The popular success of his next feature film, International House (1933) established him as a major star. The songwriter Leo Robin wrote the scores for these two prominent films, Poppy and International House as well as others including Alice in Wonderland, The Big Broadcast of 1938, Six of a Kind and Tales of Manhattan. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of a scene with W. C. Fields playing an instrument & Rochelle Hudson singing “Rendezvous with a Dream” penned by Leo Robin from Poppy.

 

Sunday, January 29, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Victor Mature! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a stage, film and television actor who starred most notably in several Biblical movies during the 1950s and was well recognized for his dark good looks and mega-watt smile. His best known film roles include One Million B.C. (1940), My Darling Clementine (1946), Kiss of Death (1947), Samson and Delilah (1949), Easy Living (1949)  (the lyrics of theme song Easy Living penned by Leo Robin) and The Robe (1953). He also appeared in a large number of musicals opposite such stars as Rita Hayworth and Betty Grable including musical scores by songwriter Leo Robin such as My Gal Sal and Footlight Serenade. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of  Victor Mature and Rita Hayworth singing “Oh the Pity of it All” in My Gal Sal.

 

 

Friday, January 27, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Buddy DeSylva! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a songwriter, film producer and record executive. He wrote or co-wrote many popular songs in Tin Pan Alley. In 1942, Johnny Mercer along with Glenn Wallichs and DeSylva together founded Capitol Records, which continues to this day. Buddy DeSylva was songwriter Leo Robin’s idol and DeSylva offered him the chance to write a song with composer Richard Myers for The Greenwich Village Follies. Later on in 1933 Buddy DeSylva and Leo Robin would work together with Richard A. Whiting on the score for the film My Weakness. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Richard Himber Orchestra performing “Gather Lip Rouge while You May” whose witty lyrics were penned by Leo Robin for My Weakness.

 

Friday, January 27, 2017 Happy Birthday, 185 years ago today, to the legendary Lewis Carroll! Today, we celebrate this English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon, and photographer who is best known for the overwhelming commercial success of the first Alice book that changed his life in many ways. The fame of his alter ego “Lewis Carroll” soon spread around the world and he was inundated with fan mail and with sometimes unwanted attention. His most famous writings are Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1865), its sequel Through the Looking-Glass (1871), which includes the poem Jabberwocky and the poem The Hunting of the Snark. He is noted for his mastery at word play, logic, and fantasy.

Alice in Wonderland is a 1933 film version based on the famous Alice novels of Lewis Carroll featuring an all-star cast including W. C. Fields as Humpty Dumpty, Edna May Oliver as the Red Queen, Cary Grant as the Mock Turtle , Gary Cooper as the White Knight, Edward Everett Horton as The Hatter, Charles Ruggles as The March Hare, and Baby LeRoy as The Joker. Charlotte Henry played her first leading role as Alice. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of the trailer for Alice in Wonderland with the song of the same name, sang by Leo Robin and written by Dimitri Tiomkin & Leo Robin.

 

 

 

Friday, January 27, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary composer Jerome Kern! Today, we celebrate this legendary composer who his best known for his compositions of musical theatre including the Broadway musical Show Boat  and popular music. One of the most important American theatre composers of the early 20th century, he wrote more than 700 songs, used in over 100 stage works, including such classics as “Ol’ Man River,” “Can’t Help Lovin’ Dat Man,” “A Fine Romance,” “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes,” “All the Things You Are,” “The Way You Look Tonight,” “Long Ago (and Far Away)” and “Who?” He collaborated with many of the leading librettists and lyricists of his era including Leo Robin where they wrote the resplendent film score for Centennial Summer in 1946 including the cheerful “Up with the Lark” and the torchy “In Love in Vain” that became popular standards. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of a scene from Centennial Summer with the torchy “In Love in Vain.”

 

Wednesday, January 25, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Etta James! Today, we celebrate this icon who was a singer who performed in various genres including blues, R&B, soul, rock and roll, jazz and gospel. Starting her career in 1954, she gained fame with hits including “The Wallflower,” “At Last,” “Tell Mama,” “Something’s Got a Hold of Me,” and “I’d Rather Go Blind” (for which she wrote the lyrics). James is regarded as having bridged the gap between rhythm and blues and rock and roll. She won six Grammy Awards and 17 Blues Music Awards. She was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993, the Blues Hall of Fame in 2001, and the Grammy Hall of Fame in both 1999 and 2008. Rolling Stone magazine ranked James number 22 on its list of the 100 Greatest Singers of All Time and number 62 on its list of the 100 Greatest Artists. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Etta James singing Leo Robin’s “Prisoner of Love.”

 

Friday, January 20, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic George Burns! Today, we celebrate this icon who was a comedian, actor, singer, and writer. He was one of the few entertainers whose career successfully spanned vaudeville, radio, film and television. His arched eyebrow and cigar-smoke punctuation became familiar trademarks for over three-quarters of a century. He and his wife, Gracie Allen, appeared on radio, television, and film as the comedy duo Burns and Allen. After they met at a vaudeville theater, the two immediately launched a new partnership, Burns and Allen, with Gracie playing the role of the “straight man” and George delivering the punch lines as the comedian. Burns and Allen got a start in motion pictures with a series of comic films in the 1930s with a great many of them being musical comedies with scores penned by lyricist Leo Robin including The Big Broadcast (1932), College Humor (1933), International House (1933), Six of a Kind (1934), (the latter two films with W.C. Fields), The Big Broadcast of 1936 (1935), Here Comes Cookie (1935),  College Holiday (1936), The Big Broadcast of 1937 (1936). After these earlier films, he would not return to films for nearly 40 years until a career revival in 1975 when he played an amiable, beloved and unusually active comedy elder statesman in the film The Sunshine Boys, for which he won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor followed in 1977 when he starred in another hit film, Oh, God! Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of a scene with Burns & Allen and a Leo Robin tune “La Bomba” in The Big Broadcast of 1937.

 

 

Wednesday, January 18, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Cary Grant! Today, we celebrate this legendary British-American actor best known as one of classic Hollywood’s definitive romantic leading men. He began a career in Hollywood in the early 1930s, and became known for his trademark transatlantic accent, light-hearted approach to acting and comic timing, and debonair demeanor. He established a name for himself in vaudeville in the 1920s and toured the United States before moving to Hollywood in the early 1930s. He initially appeared in crime films or dramas such as Blonde Venus (1932) and She Done Him Wrong (1933), but later gained renown for his appearances in romantic comedy and screwball comedy films such as Kiss and Make up (1934), The Awful Truth (1937), Bringing Up Baby (1938), His Girl Friday (1940) and The Philadelphia Story (1940). Leo Robin penned the lyrics for delightful songs in both Blonde Venus and Kiss and Make up. For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Cary Grant singing Leo Robin’s “Love Divided by Two” from the film Kiss and Make up. 

 

Wednesday, January 18, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Danny Kaye! Today, we celebrate this legend who was an actor, singer, dancer, comedian, and musician. His performances featured physical comedy, idiosyncratic pantomimes, and rapid-fire novelty songs. Kaye starred in many classic movies including Wonder Man (1945), The Kid from Brooklyn (1946), The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (1947), The Inspector General (1949), Hans Christian Andersen (1952), White Christmas (1954) and The Court Jester(1956). His films were popular, especially his performances of patter songs and favorites such as “Inchworm” and “The Ugly Duckling.” Wonder Man featured the dazzling number, “So-o-o-o-o in Love,” written by Leo Robin and David Rose and nominated for Best original Song in 1945. He hosted a variety hour on CBS television, The Danny Kaye Show, from 1963 to 1967, which won four Emmy awards and a Peabody award. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Liza Minnelli performing Leo Robin’s “For Every Man There’s a Woman” on The Danny Kaye Show. 

 

Wednesday, January 18, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Ethel Merman! Today, we celebrate this legendary actress and singer who is best known primarily for her voice and roles in musical theatre where she has been called “the undisputed First Lady of the musical comedy stage.” Among the many standards introduced by Merman in Broadway musicals are “I Got Rhythm” (from Girl Crazy); “Everything’s Coming Up Roses”, “Some People”, and “Rose’s Turn” (from Gypsy—Merman starred as Rose in the original 1959 Broadway production); and the Cole Porter songs “It’s De-Lovely” (from Red, Hot and Blue), “Friendship” (from DuBarry Was a Lady), and “I Get a Kick Out of You”, “You’re the Top”, and “Anything Goes” (from Anything Goes). The Irving Berlin song “There’s No Business Like Show Business”, written for the musical Annie Get Your Gun, became Merman’s theme song. Ethel has recorded Broadway songs from the smash hit Gentlemen Prefer Blondes written by Jule Styne and Leo Robin including “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” and “I’m Just a Little Girl from Little Rock.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Merman singing Leo Robin’s “Shanghai-Dee-Ho” from the film Anything Goes.

 

Saturday, January 14, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Karen Elson! Today, we celebrate this icon who is a model and singer-songwriter. Elson was born in Oldham, England. After being spotted by a talent scout while shopping at age 16, Elson embarked on a modeling career. Elson appeared on the covers of Vogue, Elle, and W magazines and also appeared in advertising campaigns for Burberry, Chanel, and Yves St. Laurent. While her modeling career was taking off, she also explored her passion for music, writing songs and teaching herself how to play guitar. Elson ventured into becoming a musician slowly and achieved success. In a mini-film created by Parisian Cartier, Elson channels Marilyn Monroe, as she is surrounded by a bevy of suitors and sings the classic song written by Jule Styne and Leo Robin, “Diamonds are a Girl’s Best Friend,” recalling scenes from the 1953 film Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Elson singing “Diamonds are a Girl’s Best Friend.” 

 

Saturday, January 14, 2017 Happy Birthday to the legendary Russ Columbo! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a was a baritone, songwriter, violinist and actor and famous for romantic ballads such as his signature tune and own composition “Prisoner of Love.” Columbo’s romantic appeal made him recognized as “Radio’s Valentino.” “Prisoner of Love” is a standard with lyrics by songwriter Leo Robin that has been recorded by the likes of Perry Como, Frank Sinatra, Lena Horne, Bing Crosby, Billy Eckstine and James Brown. Perry Como had a number one hit on Billboard with his recording and James Brown had an iconic performance in a concert movie The T.A.M.I. Show in 1964. Colombo is one of the historical figures named in the Neil Diamond composition “Done Too Soon” due to the accidental fatal shot by his friend at age 26. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Columbo singing “Prisoner of Love.”

 

 

Tuesday, January 10, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Rod Stewart! Today, we celebrate this icon who is a British rock singer-songwriter and is best known for his trademark distinctive raspy singing voice that led to his prominence. Born and raised in London, he is of Scottish and English ancestry and is one of the best-selling music artists of all time, having sold over 100 million records worldwide. In the UK, he has had six consecutive number one albums and his tally of 62 UK hit singles includes 31 that reached the top ten, six of which gained the #1 position. In the US, he has had 16 top ten singles, with four reaching #1 on the Billboard Hot 100. He was knighted in the 2016 Birthday Honours for services to music and charity. In the early 2000s, Stewart released a series of successful albums interpreting the Great American Songbook where  he concentrated on singing 1930s and 1940s popular standards from The Great American Songbook, written by songwriters such as Irving Berlin, Cole Porter, George and Ira Gershwin, and Leo Robin with great popular success. Stewart released his fourth songbook album in 2005, Thanks for the Memory: The Great American Songbook 4 which included Leo Robin’s iconic song — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Stewart singing “Thanks for the Memory.” 

 

Sunday, January 8, 2017 Happy Birthday to the iconic Elvis Presley! Today, we celebrate this icon who was a singer and actor and regarded as one of the most significant cultural icons of the 20th century. Elvis is known as “The King of Rock and Roll”, or simply, “The King” and is one of the most celebrated and influential musicians of the 20th century. Commercially successful in many genres, including pop, blues and gospel, he is the best-selling solo artist in the history of recorded music, with estimated record sales of around 600 million units worldwide. Presley was featured in the first globally broadcast concert via satellite, Aloha from Hawaii, airing on January 14, reaching millions of viewers live and on tape delay. Presley’s costume became the most recognized example of the elaborate concert garb with which his latter-day persona became closely associated. As described by Bobbie Ann Mason, “At the end of the show, when he spreads out his American Eagle cape, with the full stretched wings of the eagle studded on the back, he becomes a god figure.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Presley singing “Blue Hawaii” in connection with the groundbreaking concert, Aloha from Hawaii.

 

Happy Birthday to these legends this first week of the new year — Carole Landis on January1, Ray Milland on January 3, Jane Wyman on January 5 and Shirley Ross on January 7! Today and this week, we celebrate these legends who were actors and actresses who starred in many films with song scores written by lyricist Leo Robin. Carole Landis starred in Cadet Girl, Moon Over Miami, My Gal Sal and Wintertime. Ray Milland starred in Easy Living, Ebb Tide, Four Hours to Kill, Jungle Princess and The Big Broadcast of 1937. Jane Wyman starred in Anything Goes, Footlight Serenade and Just for You. Shirley Ross starred in Blossoms on Broadway, Paris Honeymoon, The Big Broadcast of 1937, The Big Broadcast of 1938 and Waikiki Wedding. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, we celebrate these Birthdays with this memorable musical moment of a celebratory scene from Paris Honeymoon with Bing Crosby singing “Joobalai,” the contagious song written by the famous songwriting team — Leo Robin and Ralph Rainger.

Saturday, December 31, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary composer and pianist Jule Styne! Today, we celebrate this British-American legendary composer who his best-known for his most popular and famous series of Broadway musicals including his first, in 1947, High Button Shoes, with Cahn, followed by Peter Pan (additional music), Bells Are Ringing, Gypsy, Do Re Mi, Funny Girl, Sugar (with a story based on the movie Some Like It Hot, but all new music), and the Tony-winning Hallelujah, Baby!. In 1949, Styne wrote the musical score with Leo Robin, one of America’s first and most prolific film lyricists, for the smash hit Gentlemen Prefer Blondes which featured the songs “Bye Bye, Baby,” “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend,” “I Love What I’m Doing,” “I’m Just a Little Girl from Little Rock” and “Sunshine, Sunshine” — just to name a handful. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell singing “I’m Just a Little Girl from Little Rock.”

 

Saturday, December 31, 2016 Wishing you a Happy New Year with the hope that you will have many blessings in the year to come! There are numerous movies set on or around the New Year that have a New Year’s Eve theme to ring in 2017. Films from multiple genres including horror, comedy, musical and drama have this holiday feel. We remember the 1940 romantic comedy Remember the Night, a 1940 Christmas & New Year’s film, directed by Mitchell Leisen, and starring Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray. There is a touching scene where MacMurray takes Stanwyck for dinner to a supper club and Martha Mears sings “Easy Living,” a jazz standard written by Leo Robin and Ralph Rainger  for and introduced in the film Easy Living directed by Mitchell Leisen. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is that stirring scene from Remember the Night with the popular standard “Easy Living.”

 

Tuesday, December 27, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary Marlene Dietrich! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a German-American actress and singer. In the 1920s, she acted on the Berlin stage and in silent films, making her film debut in 1922. She was propelled to international fame by director Josef von Sternberg, who cast her as Lola-Lola in The Blue Angel (1930). The movie’s mainstream success brought her a contract with Paramount Pictures in the United States. Paramount sought to market Dietrich as a German answer to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer’s Swedish sensation, Greta Garbo. Her first American film, Morocco (1930), directed by Sternberg, earned Dietrich her only Oscar nomination. Dietrich starred in a several films with song scores written by lyricist Leo Robin where she introduced many of these songs including Morocco (1930) (“Apples” Aka “What Am I Bid for My Apple” and “Give Me the Man”), Blonde Venus (1932), The Devil Is a Woman (1935) (“Three Sweethearts Have I”) and Desire (1936) (“Awake in a Dream”). Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Dietrich singing “What Am I Bid for My Apple” in Morocco.

 

 

Sunday, December 25, 2016 Our warmest wishes for you and your family during this most wonderful time of the year!  May the Holiday season fill your home with joy, your heart with love and your life with laughter. While you spend time with your family & friends cozily inside with mugs of hot cocoa, we remember Coney Island, a 1943 spectacular musical film released by Twentieth Century Fox and starring Betty Grable in one of her biggest hits. This is a “gay nineties” turn-of-the-century story co-starring George Montgomery, Cesar Romero, and Phil Silvers and a lively musical  score written by the Famous Paramount songwriting team of Leo Robin & Ralph Rainger with a host of song-and-dance numbers choreographed by Hermes Pan. As you enjoy the holiday cheer, here is a magical musical moment of a memorable wintry scene from Coney Island with Betty Grable & a chorus ensemble singing a merry medley of joyous songs — “Winter, Winter” by Leo Robin & Ralph Rainger and “Pretty Baby” music by Egbert Van Alstyne & Tony Jackson with lyrics by Gus Kahn and “Jingle Bells” by James Pierpont.

 

Sunday, December 25, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary Tony Martin! Today, we celebrate this legend who was an actor and singer and who was married to performer Cyd Charisse for 60 years. During World War II, he first joined the United States Navy, then joined the United States Army Air Forces. As a corporal he was assigned to Capt. Glenn Miller’s band, then was promoted to technical sergeant in the Air Transport Command where he was put to work as an entertainer, forming a troupe of amateur talent from the command and taking it around the various bases to perform. He eventually signed with various record companies. He appeared in film musicals in the 1940s and 1950s. Martin starred in a several films with song scores written by lyricist Leo Robin and Martin introduced many of these songs that became popular standards including Casbah (“For Every Man There’s a Woman,” “Hooray for Love,” “It Was Written in the Stars,” and “What’s Good about Goodbye?”), Hit the Deck (“Hallelujah”)  and Two Tickets to Broadway (“The Closer You Are”). Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Martin singing “For Every Man There’s a Woman” in Casbah.

Saturday, December 24, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary composer Harry Warren! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a composer and was one of the first major songwriters to write primarily for film. Over a career spanning four decades, Warren wrote more than 800 songs including standards like “I Only Have Eyes for You”, “You Must Have Been a Beautiful Baby”, “Jeepers Creepers”, “The Gold Diggers’ Song (We’re in the Money)”, “That’s Amore”, “The More I See You”, “At Last” and “Chattanooga Choo Choo.” Warren was one of America’s most prolific film composers and his songs have been featured in over 300 films. He wrote film scores with Leo Robin, one of America’s first and most prolific film lyricists, including Just for You and The Gang’s All Here. They wrote songs featured in films that became popular standards like – “The Ol’ Spring Fever,” “Zing a Little Zong,” “Journey to a Star,” “No Love, No Nothin,” “Paducah,” “The Lady in the Tutti Frutti Hat,” “You Discover You’re in New York” – just to name seven. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Leo Robin & Harry Warren’s song “Zing a Little Zong” in Just for You.

 

Sunday, December 18, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic Betty Grable! Today, we celebrate this icon who was an actress, pin-up model, dancer, and singer. Her 42 movies during the 1930s and 1940s grossed more than $100 million and she set a record of 12 consecutive years in the top 10 of box office stars. Throughout her career, Grable was a celebrated sex symbol. Her famous 1943 pin-up poster in her bathing suit became one of the most-identified photographs and the poster made her the number-one pin-up girl of World War II, rivaling Rita Hayworth. It was later included in the Life magazine project “100 Photographs that Changed the World”. Hosiery specialists of the era often noted the ideal proportions of her legs as thigh (18.5 in (47 cm)), calf (12 in (30 cm)), and ankle (7.5 in (19 cm)). Grable’s legs were famously insured by her studio for $1 million as a publicity stunt.

Grable starred in many films with song scores written by lyricist Leo Robin including A Yank in the R.A.F.(“Another Little Dream Won’t Do Us An Harm” and “Hi-Ya Love”), Coney Island(“There’s Danger in a Dance” and “Winter, Winter”), Footlight Serenade(“I Heard The Birdies Sing”), Give Me a Sailor, Man About Town, Meet Me After the Show, Moon Over Miami(“Loveliness and Love” and “You Started Something”), Tattletales and The Lady in Ermine(“This Is the Moment”). Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Betty Grable singing the Oscar nominated song “This Is the Moment” in That Lady in Ermine.

 

Tuesday, December 13, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic Taylor Swift! Today, we celebrate this icon who is a singer-songwriter and best known for narrative songs about her personal life, which has received much media attention. As a songwriter, Swift has received awards from the Nashville Songwriters Association and the Songwriters Hall of Fame. She is also the recipient of ten Grammy Awards, five Guinness World Records, one Emmy Award, 23 Billboard Music Awards, 11 Country Music Association Awards, eight Academy of Country Music Awards, and one Brit Award. Swift is one of the best-selling artists of all time, having sold more than 40 million albums—including 27.1 million in the U.S.—and 130 million single downloads. For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Swift and many songstresses’ kisses including when Swift Kisses Selena Gomez at the 2015 MTV Video Music Awards along with Marlene Dietrich actress singing “Give Me the Man” in a famous and scandalous scene from Morocco.

 

Monday, December 12, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic Francis Albert “Frank” Sinatra! Today, we celebrate this icon who was an American singer, actor, and producer who was one of the most popular and influential musical artists of the 20th century. Sinatra’s music has been considered timeless by many. He is one of the best-selling music artists of all time, having sold more than 150 million records worldwide. Born in Hoboken, New Jersey, to Italian immigrants, he began his musical career in the swing era with Harry James and Tommy Dorsey. He became one of its best known performers as part of the Rat Pack. One of the legendary figures in the Great American Songbook, his work as a singer he recorded such standards penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “Blue Hawaii,” “Bye Bye, Baby,” “For Every Man There’s a Woman,” “If I Should Lose You,” “Just a Kiss Apart,” “Love Is Just around the Corner,” “My Ideal,” “Prisoner of Love,” “Thanks for the Memory,” and “With Every Breath I Take” — just to name ten. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment in the studio of Frank Sinatra with Quincy Jones & Orchestra singing “If I Should Lose You.”

 

Saturday, December 10, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary Dorothy Lamour! Today, we celebrate this legend who was an actress, singer and pinup girl. Lamour began her career in the 1930s as a big band singer. In 1936, she moved to Hollywood where she signed with Paramount Pictures. Her appearance as “Ulah” in The Jungle Princess in 1936, with the song “Moonlight and Shadows” penned by Leo Robin, brought her fame and marked the beginning of her image as the “Sarong Queen.” In the film, Lamour plays the role of “Ulah”, a jungle native who wore an Edith Head-designed sarong throughout the film. The Jungle Princess was a big hit for the studio and Lamour would be associated with sarongs for the rest of her career.

During World War II, Lamour was among the most popular pinup girls among American servicemen and she was also known for her volunteer working selling war bonds during tours in which movie stars would travel the country selling U.S. government bonds to the public. Lamour reportedly sold $300 million worth of bonds earning her the nickname “The Bombshell of Bombs.” Lamour starred in many films with song scores written by lyricist Leo Robin including College Holiday, Man About Town, Riding High, St. Louis Blues, The Big Broadcast of 1938, The Jungle Princess and Tropic Holiday. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Dorothy Lamour singing “Moonlight and Shadows” in Jungle Princess.

 

Tuesday, December 6, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary Bobby Van! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a singer, dancer and actor and will always be remembered as the ecstatic young fellow who made like a human pogo stick during a “Hopping Dance” number in the 1953 musical romance Small Town Girl from MGM, with imaginative choreography by Busby Berkeley, in a number called “Take Me to Broadway,” with music by Nicholas Brodszky and lyrics by Leo Robin. Bobby Van was wearing a white suit with a white carnation, happily became an energetic human pogo stick, literally bouncing and jumping his way through the small town (MGM’s backlot) – across a street and over the lawns of various houses to the town. He interacted with passerbys, a milkman, a flower vendor, a mailman, a shoeshine boy, a sweeper, a wooden Indian, and a horse pulling a fruit and vegetable wagon. At one point, he clanged two garbage can lids together, jumped and danced with a little girl and a dog, and gathered a large crowd of people following him. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Bobby Van in his famous “Street Dance” sequence to “Take Me to Broadway.”

 

Monday, December 5, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary director Otto Preminger! Today, we celebrate this Austrian American theatre and film director who is known for directing over 35 feature films in a five-decade career after leaving the theatre. He first gained attention for film noir mysteries such as Laura (1944) and Fallen Angel (1945), while in the 1950s and ’60s, he directed a number of high-profile adaptations of popular novels and stage works. In response to the hugely successful 1944 MGM musical film Meet Me in St. Louis, 20th Century Fox produced the 1946 film Centennial Summer, would be his first to be shot entirely in color. Zanuck enlisted Preminger and most of the wonderful score was written by composer and the lyrics penned by Leo Robin with introduction of songs that became popular standards including “In Love in Vain” and “Up with the Lark.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of a scene from Centennial Summer with the high spirited “Up with the Lark.” 

Sunday, December 4, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary producer and songwriter Lewis Gensler! Today, we celebrate this producer, film writer and songwriter who is best remembered for the classic song “Just around the Corner,” with music written by Gensler and lyrics penned by Leo Robin. It was introduced in the 1934 film Here is My Heart where it was first sung by Bing Crosby and Kitty Carlisle. The song has since become a popular standard and has been recorded by many artists including crooners Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin, jazz pianist Earl Hines and pop singer Kenny Rodgers with the gospel group Take 6. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Bing Crosby singing “Love Is Just Around the Corner” in Here is My Heart.

 

Friday, December 2, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic Britney Spears! Today, we celebrate this icon who is a singer, dancer and actress and credited with influencing the revival of teen pop during the late 1990s. She became the ‘best-selling teenage artist of all time’ and garnered honorific titles including the “Princess of Pop.” Her work has earned her numerous awards and accolades, including a Grammy Award, six MTV Video Music Awards including the Lifetime Achievement Award, ten Billboard Music Awards including the Billboard Millennium Award and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Spears and many songstresses’ kisses including when Madonna kissed Spears at the 2003 MTV Video Music Awards and Spears Kiss at the 2011 Billboard Music Awards along with Marlene Dietrich actress singing “Give Me the Man” in a famous and scandalous scene from Morocco.

 

Thursday, December 1, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic Woody Allen! Today, we celebrate this actor, comedian, filmmaker, playwright, and musician whose career spans more than six decades and who is best-known for over 40 films including his best films — Annie Hall (1977), Manhattan (1979), and Hannah and Her Sisters (1986). In 2007 he said Stardust Memories (1980), The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985), and Match Point (2005). Critic Roger Ebert described Allen as “a treasure of the cinema.”

In Matias Bombal’s Hollywood, film critic Matias Antonio Bombal reviewed Woody Allen’s most recent film, Cafe Society, a story in the 1930s Hollywood. Bombal praises that “The entire soundtrack is joyfully filled with the exquisite musical taste of Woody Allen.” He is particularly fond of the “scene with Ralph Rainger and Leo Robin’s 1934 song “June in January” (for) adding just the right support to finish the total effect of the moment. It occurs as Bobby gets to know Veronica one late evening in a jazz club in New York.” “June in January” is a popular song introduced in the 1934 movie Here Is My Heart by Bing Crosby. The Crosby recording, a number #1 hit on Brunswick Records, has since has become a popular standard, recorded by many artists. For your enjoyment, here is Matias Bombal”s Hollywood review along with this wonderful scene.

 

Wednesday, November 30, 2016 Happy Birthday, 349 years ago today, to the legendary Jonathan Swift! Today, we celebrate this Anglo-Irish satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for the Whigs, then for the Tories), poet and cleric who became Dean of St Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin. Swift is best remembered for works such as Gulliver’s Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, Drapier’s Letters, The Battle of the Books, An Argument Against Abolishing Christianity and A Tale of a Tub. He is regarded by the Encyclopedia Britannica as the foremost prose satirist in the English language. His deadpan, ironic writing style, particularly in A Modest Proposal, has led to such satire being subsequently termed “Swiftian.”

Gulliver’s Travels is a 1939 American cel-animated Technicolor feature film, produced by Max Fleischer and directed by Dave Fleischer for Fleischer Studios about an explorer who helps a small kingdom who declared war after an argument over a wedding song. It was the second animated feature film produced by an American studio, the first being Snow White and the Seven Dwarf from Walt Disney Productions. The story is based very loosely on the first chapter Lilliput and Blefuscu depicted in Jonathan Swift’s 18th century novel Gulliver’s Travels. The songwriting team Leo Robin & Ralph Rainger wrote many memorable songs for the film including “Faithful Forever” and “Bluebirds in the Moonlight.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of “Faithful Forever” from Gulliver’s Travels.

 

Friday, November 25, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary Arthur Schwartz! Today, we celebrate this legend who was an American composer and film producer. A composer for Broadway and Hollywood from the ’20s to the ’60s, Arthur Schwartz wrote most of his popular tunes with lyricist Howard Dietz and will always be remembered for many of his compositions that became standards especially the iconic song — “That’s Entertainment.” He recorded many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including from the 1946 musical The Time, the Place and the Girl with a sparkling Leo Robin& Arthur Schwartz score with musical numbers that are lively and entertaining like “A Gal in Calico,” “A Rainy Night in Rio” and “Oh, but I Do!” — just to name a few. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Doris Day singing “Oh, but I Do!”

 

Friday, November 25, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary Ricardo Montalbán! Today, we celebrate this legendary actor whose career spanned seven decades, during which he became known for many different roles. During the 1970s, he was a spokesman in automobile advertisements for Chrysler, including those in which he extolled the “fine Corinthian leather” used for the Cordoba’s interior. Perhaps, he will always be remembered for playing Mr. Roarke on the television series Fantasy Island from 1977 to 1984. He received distinction with the honor of a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Screen Actors Guild in 1993. Latin Lovers, a 1953 romantic musical comedy film made by MGM, starred Montalbán and Lana Turner with a musical score by songwriters Leo Robin & Nicholas Brodszky. Fernando Lamas was originally cast in the role that Ricardo Montalban played but Lamas and Lana Turner were lovers and when they broke up, she insisted he be replaced. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Montalbán singing and dancing to “A Little More of Your Amor” in Latin Lovers.

 

Thursday, November 24, 2016 May you and your family be blessed on this Thanksgiving Day and throughout the rest of the year! Thanksgiving is all about a time for being grateful and for counting all of our many blessings! Hoping your Thanksgiving is filled with blessings and joy! We remember Small Town Girl, a 1953 romantic comedy musical film directed by László Kardos and starring Jane Powell, Farley Granger and Ann Miller with music by Nicholas Brodszky and lyrics by Leo Robin and the dance numbers choreographed by the legendary Busby Berkeley. There is a memorable scene with the church choir, where Jane Powell & ensemble sing the “Lullaby Of The Lord.” On this special day of thankfulness, for your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Jane Powell & ensemble performing “The Lullaby Of The Lord” from Small Town Girl.

 

Wednesday, November 23, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary composer Hoagy Carmichael! Today, we celebrate this legendary composer, pianist, singer, actor, and bandleader who is best known for composing the music for “Stardust,” “Georgia on My Mind,” “The Nearness of You,” and “Heart and Soul,” four of the most-recorded American songs of all time. Hoagy Carmichael collaborated with lyricist Leo Robin on the song “Kinda Lonesome” that was introduced by Maxine Sullivan in the 1939 film St. Louis Blues. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Maxine Sullivan singing “Kinda Lonesome.”

 

 

Friday, November 18, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic Johnny Mercer! Today, we celebrate this icon who was a lyricist, composer and was also a popular singer who recorded his own songs as well as those written by others. He is best known as a lyricist and wrote the lyrics to more than fifteen hundred songs, including compositions for movies and Broadway shows. One of the legendary figures in the Great American Songbook, his work as a lyricist, and occasionally composer and lyricist, has produced such standards as “Skylark,” “In the Cool, Cool, Cool of the Evening” “One For My Baby,” “Moon River,” “Days of Wine and Roses,” “On the Acheson, Topeka, and the Santa Fe” and “Hooray For Hollywood.” Well regarded as a singer, with a folksy quality, Mercer recorded many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “A Gal in Calico,” “Hooray for Love” and “My Cutey’s Due at Two-to-Two Today” — just to name a few. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Mercer singing in his familiar folksy style “A Gal in Calico.”

 

Friday, November 18, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary Amanda Lear! Today, we celebrate this icon who is a French singer, lyricist, painter, television presenter, actress and former model. Lear grew up in the south of France and in Switzerland, and studied art in Paris and at Saint Martin’s School of Art in London. She began her professional career as a fashion model in the mid-1960s and went on to model for Paco Rabanne and Ossie Clark among others. Lear first came into the public eye as the cover model for Roxy Music’s album For Your Pleasure in 1973. She was a million-album-selling disco queen, mainly in Continental Europe and Scandinavia, signed to Ariola Records from the mid-1970s to the early 1980s. Lear went on to launch a very successful TV career and she hosted many successful TV shows including her own French show Cherchez la femme in the early 1990s. She recorded a mini album entitled A L, with four covers of classic songs, including songwriter Leo Robin’s “Bye Bye Baby” in 1985. “Bye Bye Baby” was originally performed by Marilyn Monroe in her 1953 movie Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Lear singing “Bye Bye Baby.”

 

Wednesday, November 16, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic Diana Krall! Today, we celebrate this icon who is a Canadian jazz pianist and singer and best known for her contralto vocals. She has sold more than 6 million albums in the US and over 15 million worldwide. On December 11, 2009, Billboard magazine named her the second Jazz artist of the 2000–09 decade, establishing her as one of the best-selling artists of her time. Krall is the only jazz singer to have eight albums debuting at the top of the Billboard Jazz Albums. To date, she has won five Grammy Awards and eight Juno Awards. She has also earned nine gold, three platinum, and seven multi-platinum albums. Diana Krall is a fine ballad singer and recorded this one penned by Songwriter Leo Robin — “Here Lies Love.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Diana Krall singing “Here Lies Love.”

 

Sunday, November 13, 2016 Happy Birthday, 166 years ago today, to the legendary Robert Louis Stevenson! Today, we celebrate this Scottish novelist, poet, essayist, and travel writer whose most famous works are Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde and A Child’s Garden of Verses. A literary celebrity during his lifetime, Stevenson now ranks among the 26 most translated authors in the world. Ebb Tide is a 1937 American Technicolor drama film directed by James P. Hogan and starring Oskar Homolka, Frances Farmer and Ray Milland. Much of the film is set in the South Seas and is based on the novel The Ebb-Tide by Robert Louis Stevenson and his stepson Lloyd Osbourne The theme song of the film of the same name was written by the songwriting team Leo Robin & Ralph Rainger. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of  the recording “Ebb Tide” from the film of the same name.

Saturday, November 12, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary composer and pianist Richard A. Whiting ! Today, we celebrate this legendary composer who his best-known for popular standards introduced in films. In 1929, Whiting moved to Hollywood where there were more opportunities for songwriters during the Depression. In Hollywood, he wrote a number of film scores with collaborations with lyricists including Leo Robin. They wrote hundreds of songs for a cavalcade of characters featured in a variety of diverse films featuring some of their greatest songs like “Beyond the Blue Horizon,” “I Can’t Escape from You,” “Louise,” “My Ideal” and “One Hour with You.” He was the father of singer Margaret Whiting who sold millions of records in the 1940s and ’50s with sentimental ballads including many written by the duo such as her theme song — “My Ideal.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of a flapper song written by Richard A. Whiting & Leo Robin — “I Have to Have You” from Pointed Heels.

 

Friday, November 11, 2016 Our hearts are filled with gratitude on this Veteran’s Day as we honor all the brave men and women who sacrificed so much so that we could have a better life and a country to call home. Today we recognize all our distinguished veterans whose service has allowed our nation to prosper and has allowed us all to live in freedom. Millions of Americans have sacrificed much to help protect us and the cause of freedom since 1776 and gave it in service to their nation. Gen. George Washington, in his farewell address to his officers in New York in 1783, said, “I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy as your former ones have been glorious and honorable.” This makes us remember the 1946 musical film Centennial Summer, directed by Otto Preminger, where a tale of a family, dominated by young ladies, living in Philadelphia at the time of the Centennial Exposition in 1876. On this special day, here is a memorable musical moment of a chorus ensemble of the high-spirited “Centennial – Long Live Our Free America,” written by Jerome Kern and Leo Robin, from Centennial Summer.

Monday, October 31. 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary Ethel Waters! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a blues, jazz and gospel singer and dramatic actress and whose best remembered for her singing, based in the blues tradition, featured her full-bodied voice, wide range, and slow vibrato. She frequently performed jazz, big band, and pop music, on the Broadway stage and in concerts and she introduced many popular standards including songs penned by Leo Robin from in Why Bring That Up? Ethel recorded many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “Do I Know What I’m Doing While I’m in Love?,” “Shoo, Shoo Boogie Boo” and “True Blue Lou” — just to name a few. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Ethel Waters performing “Shoo, Shoo Boogie Boo” in Why Bring That Up?

 

 

Friday, October 28, 2016 Fifty-two years ago today, a dozen acts came together for a special concert, held at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium on October 28 and 29, 1964, that would capture a moment in rock and roll history. The idea behind the Teenage Awards Music International was to present a snapshot of the music explosion being embraced by youngsters of the era. A film of the shows was released in theaters later that year known as the T.A.M.I. Show. In one of the most impressive bills in rock history, from Liverpool to Detroit and from Los Angeles to New York, the star studded lineup included performances by numerous popular rock and roll and R&B musicians with the likes of Jan & Dean, acting as hosts, the Beach Boys, the Rolling Stones, the Supremes, Gerry & the Pacemakers, James Brown and the Famous Flames, Lesley Gore, Marvin Gaye, Billy J. Kramer & the Dakotas, Smokey Robinson & the Miracles, the Barbarians and Chuck Berry. T.A.M.I. Show is particularly well known for James Brown’s performance, which features his legendary dance moves and explosive energy. In 2006, T.A.M.I. Show was deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of James Brown performing Leo Robin’s Popular Standard — “Prisoner of Love.” 

 

 

Tuesday, October 25, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic Katy Perry! Today, we celebrate this icon who is a singer and songwriter. After singing in church during her childhood, she pursued a career in gospel music as a teenager. Perry rose to fame in 2008 with the release of the single “I Kissed a Girl,” the hit song that she describes the lyrics as being “about the magical beauty of a woman.” The allure of kissing a girl was captured in many performances since then by songstresses including when Miley Cyrus kisses Katy Perry at her concert at the Staples Center, afterwards, the classy Katy Perry referred to it as “a friendly girly kiss, you know, as us girls do.” This makes us remember the 1930 romance drama Morocco directed by Josef von Sternberg and starring Gary Cooper with music written by lyricist ‪‎Leo Robin & composer Karl Hajos with titillating musical numbers that are alluring and entertaining like “Give Me the Man.” The fireworks girl’s insight is spot on as these girly kisses are tantalizing to everyone of every sex like it should be. For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of all these songstresses’ kisses along with a glamorous actress singing “Give Me the Man” in a famous and scandalous scene from Morocco. 

 

 

Saturday, October 22, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary Mitzi Green! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a child actress for Paramount and RKO, in the early talkie era. She then acted on Broadway and in other stage works, as well as in films and on television. Green was cast in such conventional juvenile parts as Becky Thatcher in Tom Sawyer (1930) and Huckleberry Finn (1931). She also starred in the title role of Little Orphan Annie. At the age of 14, she played a soubrette role in Transatlantic Merry-Go-Round (1934). She starred as herself in Paramount on Parade, a 1930 all-star American Pre-Code revue released by Paramount Pictures to be their answer to all-star revues like Hollywood Revue of 1929 from Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, The Show of Shows from Warner Brothers, and King of Jazz from Universal Studios. The film featured stars included Clara Bow, Maurice Chevalier, Gary Cooper and Mitzi Green and other Paramount stars. One of the film’s acts included child star Mitzi Green singing songwriter Leo Robin’s “All I Want is Just One” of her impression of Maurice Chevalier. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Mitzi singing “All I Want Is Just One.”

 

 

Wednesday October 19, 2016 Ariana Grande had a sparkling performance at Tiffany & Co.’s party to celebrate its renovated Beverly Hills store on this past Thursday night on October 13. Reese Witherspoon, Jennifer Garner, Kate Hudson, Halle Berry, and more watched her perform some tracks from Dangerous Woman, and then the most appropriate throwback track: “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend,” made iconic by Marilyn Monroe from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes in 1953. Ariana shared the special moment on Instagram. “Because what else do you sing when you’re singin at @tiffanyandco 😌,” Grande put it simply on Instagram. For your enjoyment, here is Ariana’s marvelous jazz version of “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” at Tiffany & Co.’s party.

 

 

Wednesday, October 19, 2016 With the election day fast approaching, proud Americans are taking their civic duty responsibly by becoming educated about the issues and candidates. A voter should know each candidates’ stand on issues that are important to the voter. An individual can learn about the candidates’ stands on issues through television news, social media and newspapers. Many candidates attend and speak at community events and, of course, you can tune in to watch the Presidential debate on TV tonight. This makes us remember the musical comedy The Big Broadcast of 1937, the third in the series by Paramount Pictures with the  stars Jack Benny, George Burns, Gracie Allen and the orchestra of Benny Goodman with the musical score that included the hit song “Vote for Mr. Rhythm,” written by the famous songwriting team — Leo Robin & Ralph Rainger. On this special day of the third debate, for your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of The First Lady of Song, Ella Fitzgerald, singing “Vote for Mr. Rhythm” with each 2016 Presidential candidate displaying their own style of rhythm on the campaign trail.

 

 

Tuesday, October 18, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary composer Frederick Hollander! Today, we celebrate this legend who was a German film composer and author. He was born in London, where his father, operetta composer Victor Hollaender, worked as a musical director at the Barnum & Bailey Circus. In 1899 Hollaender’s family returned to Berlin, his father began teaching at the Stern Conservatory, where his son became a student in Engelbert Humperdinck’s master class. He had to leave Nazi Germany in 1933 because of his Jewish descent and first moved to Paris. He emigrated to the United States the next year, where he wrote the music for over a hundred films, many with lyricist Leo Robin including Anything Goes, Artists and Models, Desire, Jungle Princess and That Lady in Ermine. They wrote numerous songs for a cavalcade of characters featured in a variety of diverse films featuring some popular songs like “Awake in a Dream,” “Moonlight and Shadows,” “My Heart and I,” “This Is the Moment” and “Whispers in the Dark” — just to name a handful. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Leo Robin & Frederick Hollander’s song “Whispers in the Dark” in Artists and Models.

 

 

Monday, October 17, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic Rita Hayworth! Today, we celebrate this icon who was an actress and dancer. She achieved fame during the 1940s as one of the era’s top stars, appearing in a total of 61 films over 37 years. The press coined the term “love goddess” to describe Hayworth after she had become the most glamorous screen idol of the 1940s and the top pin-up girl for GIs during World War II. Hayworth is perhaps best known for her films with dance performances including the 1946 film noir, Gilda, opposite Glenn Ford, in which she played the femme fatale in her first major dramatic role. Fred Astaire, with whom she made two films, called her his favorite dance partner. Her greatest success was the  musical Cover Girl (1944), with Gene Kelly. In 1942, Rita Hayworth starred along with Victor Mature in the film My Gal Sal, a biopic of 1890s composer and songwriter Paul Dresser and singer Sally Elliot. Some of the songs portrayed as Dresser’s work were actually written by him, but several were created for the film by the Hollywood songwriting team of Ralph Grainger and Leo Robin. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Rita Hayworth singing and dancing “On the Gay White Way” in My Gal Sal. 

 

 

Sunday, October 9, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic John Lennon! Today, we celebrate this icon who was born and raised in Liverpool. This English singer and songwriter, with fellow member Paul McCartney, co-founded the Beatles (1960-70), the most commercially successful band in the history of popular music. When the group disbanded in 1970, Lennon embarked on a solo career that produced hit songs such as “Give Peace a Chance,” “Working Class Hero” and “Imagine.” When you watch the documentary called Beatles Anthology, you’ll hear Paul McCartney remembering how John Lennon presented his new song “Please Please Me” to the other three Beatles. Paul says that John knew the Bing Crosby recording of “Please” and he admired the song for its clever use of the word “Please” by lyricist Leo Robin so John likewise was inspired to write a song that revolves around that word. John fondly remembered his mother singing the song “Please” as a child and used the repetition of the word in his own composition. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Bing Crosby singing “Please” in The Big Broadcast(1932).

 

Friday, October 7, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary composer and pianist Ralph Rainger! Today, we celebrate this legendary composer who his best-known for popular standards introduced in films. In 1930,  Ralph Rainger met Leo Robin. They both had fathers who wanted them to be lawyers but eventually defied them and went on to become songwriters. They both started out in New York and found their way to Hollywood and each other. For over a decade, they were Paramount’s most successful songwriting team. They wrote hundreds of songs for a cavalcade of characters featured in a variety of diverse films featuring some of their greatest songs like “Easy Living,” “Faithful Forever,” “Please,” “Love in Bloom,” “June in January,” and “Blue Hawaii.” and the Oscar-winning “Thanks for the Memory” which became Bob Hope’s theme song. Their iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Bing Crosby singing their song — “Here Lies Love” from The Big Broadcast.

 

Thursday, October 6, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary director Mitchell Leisen! Today, we celebrate this director, art director, and costume designer. He entered the film industry in the 1920s, beginning in the art and costume departments. He directed his first film in 1933 with Cradle Song and became known for his keen sense of aesthetics in the glossy Hollywood melodramas and screwball comedies he turned out. One of his best known films was the acclaimed Easy Living (1937), written by Preston Sturges and starring Jean Arthur. Songwriter Leo Robin worked with Leisen on many films including Cradle Song (1933), Four Hours to Kill (1935), Easy Living (1937), The Big Broadcast of 1937 (1936), The Big Broadcast of 1938 (1938) and Artists and Models Abroad (1938). Leo Robin wrote many classic songs that were introduced in these films including “Easy Living,” “Thanks for the Memory” and “Vote for Mr. Rhythm” — just to name a few. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of “Here’s Love in Your Eye” in The Big Broadcast of 1937.

 

Monday, October 3, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary producer-director Leo McCarey! Today, we celebrate this three-time Academy Award winning American film director, screenwriter and producer who was involved in nearly 200 movies, the most well known today being Duck Soup, Make Way for Tomorrow, The Awful Truth, Going My Way and An Affair To Remember. While focusing mainly on screwball comedies during the 1930s and becoming one of the most popular and established comedy directors of the pre-World War II era, McCarey turned towards producing more socially conscious and overtly religious movies during the 1940s, ultimately finding success and acclaim in both genres. Songwriter Leo Robin worked with Leo McCarey on a drama, Make Way for Tomorrow (1937) and a comedy, Six of a Kind (1934).

Make Way for Tomorrow is a drama film directed by Leo McCarey. The plot concerns an elderly couple (Victor Moore and Beulah Bondi) who are forced to separate when they lose their house and none of their five children will take both parents. One of the most memorable scenes from the film is a heartwarming poem “Are You Afraid” by songwriter Leo Robin. McCarey believed that it was his finest film. When he accepted his Academy Award for Best Director for The Awful Truth which was released the same year, he said “Thanks, but you gave it to me for the wrong picture.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of a scene from Make Way for Tomorrow.

 

Friday, September 30, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic singer Johnny Mathis! Today, we celebrate this icon who is well known as a romantic singer but, in fact, very versatile with a  discography that includes jazz, traditional pop, Brazilian music, Spanish music, soul music, rhythm and blues, soft rock, Broadway theatre, Tin Pan Alley standards, some blues and country songs, and even a few disco songs. He became highly popular as an album artist, with several dozen of his albums achieving gold or platinum status and 73 making the Billboard charts to date. Mathis has sold well over 350 million records worldwide making him the third biggest selling artist of the 20th century. Mathis recorded many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including  — “Beyond the Blue Horizon,” “Lost in Loveliness” and “Ride on a Rainbow” — just to name a few. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Mathis singing “Beyond the Blue Horizon.”

 

Monday, September 26, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary composer and pianist George Gershwin.  Today, we celebrate this legendary composer who his best-known for his most popular melodies including the orchestral compositions Rhapsody in Blue (1924) and An American in Paris (1928) as well as the opera Porgy and Bess (1935). George worked with his brother Ira Gershwin on  Broadway theatre and George moved to Hollywood and composed numerous film scores. Many of Gershwin’s compositions have became jazz or popular standards. The Gershwin’s were friends with Leo Robin and they all vacationed together in Paris. It is noteworthy that Leo Robin was known as the Vice President of the Sweet Fellows Club, an imaginary society invented by composer Harry Warren, of which Ira Gershwin was President. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Marilyn Monroe entertaining the troops on stage in Korea in February 1954 where she sang a medley of Robin and Gershwin songs — “Diamonds Are A Girl’s Best Friend,” ” Bye Bye, Baby” and “Do It Again.”

 

 

Saturday, September 24, 2016 Seventy-six years ago today, a famous concert known as the “Carousel of American Music” was held at the Golden Gate International Exposition on Sept. 24, 1940. This was a once-in-a-lifetime concert that gathered the top American songwriters of the day to perform their own compositions. Staged to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the composers’ rights organization, ASCAP, the all-day event featured a concert by the San Francisco Symphony followed by the performance Included: Albert Von Tilzer (singing “Take Me Out to the Ball Game”); Ann Ronnell (“Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf”); Arthur Freed (“Singin’ in the Rain”); Shelton Brooks (“Some of These Days”); James V. Monaco (“You Made Me Love You”); Bert Kalmar (“Three Little Words”); Walter Donaldson (“My Blue Heaven”); Leo Robin (“Love in Bloom”); Johnny Mercer (“Jeepers Creepers”); Hoagy Carmichael (“Stardust”); George M. Cohan (“Over There”); and Irving Berlin (“God Bless America”), among others. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment from the concert of Leo Robin singing his own song  —  “Love in Bloom.”  

 

 

Saturday, September 24. 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary Anthony Newley! Today, we celebrate this icon who was an English actor, singer and songwriter whose trademark elongated Cockney vowel sounds made his voice an unmistakable one which people either loved or hated. One of Britain’s most distinctive talents, he had his first starring role in films at the age of 16, composed hit musicals and songs, topped the hit parade himself as a pop star, played everything from romantic leads to quirky character roles in movies, starred on both the West End and Broadway stages, and became a favorite of cabaret audiences from New York to Las Vegas. He wrote novelty songs such as “Pop Goes the Weasel” and classics like “What Kind of Fool Am I”, “Who Can I Turn To” and “Candy Man” — just three of the hit songs he co-wrote. Newley was a fine ballad singer and recorded this one penned by Songwriter Leo Robin — “What’s Good about Goodbye?” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Newley singing “What’s Good about Goodbye?”

 

Wednesday, September 21, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary Eddie Cantor! Today, we celebrate this legend who was an American “illustrated song” performer, comedian, dancer, singer, actor, and songwriter. He will always be remembered for his weekly radio show where he was regarded almost as a family member by millions because his top-rated radio shows revealed intimate stories and amusing anecdotes about his wife Ida and five daughters. His eye-rolling song-and-dance routines eventually led to his nickname, “Banjo Eyes.” Cantor’s eyes became his trademark, often exaggerated in illustrations, and leading to his appearance on Broadway in the musical Banjo Eyes (1941). Cantor’s theme song was his own lyrics to the Leo Robin and Richard Whiting classic song, “One Hour with You.” and he sang it on his weekly show. What wonderful memories. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Eddie Cantor performing his version of “One Hour with You.”

 

Friday, September 16, 2016 Today is a day of pride in Mexico with the celebration of Independence Day of Mexico, commonly called Dieciséis de septiembre (September 16th). We wish Mexico a Happy Dieciséis de septiembre. This is a national holiday observed in Mexico celebrating its independence every September 16 marked by patriotic displays in every city and town all over the country with parades, festivals, feasts, parties and more. Most Mexicans including expatriates celebrate by hanging flags in their home and spending time with family. A feast is usually involved. If the food can be made red, white and green, like the Mexican Flag, all the better! This makes us remember the 1943 musical The Gang’s All Here with a dazzling Leo Robin & Harry Warren score with musical numbers that are lively and entertaining like “The Lady in the Tutti Frutti Hat” and “Paducah.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Carmen Miranda singing “Paducah” in The Gang’s All Here.

 

Tuesday, September 13, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary Dick Haymes! He was born in Argentina but brought to the U.S. as an infant and became an actor and singer. Haymes was married six times, including to film actress Rita Hayworth. Today, we celebrate this legend who is best remembered for his deep rich baritone voice with popular renditions of tender ballads such as “In Love In Vain” and It Was Written in the Stars.” He teamed with female vocalist Helen Forrest for many hit duets during World War Two. Dick recorded many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “It Was Written in the Stars,” “Thanks for the memory” and ” Zing a Little Zong” — just to name a few. For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Dick singing “In Love In Vain” with Helen Forrest.

 

Monday, September 12, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary actor-singer Maurice Chevalier! Today, we celebrate this icon who was a French actor, cabaret singer and entertainer. When talkies arrived, he went to Hollywood in 1928, where he played his first American role in Innocents of Paris. He is perhaps best known for his signature songs, his films and his trademark attire, a boater hat, which he always wore on stage with a tuxedo — all displayed with his signature song “Louise”  from Innocents of Paris where he wore his famous hat and tuxedo. Songwriter Leo Robin and Maurice Chevalier worked together in a great many films including Innocents of Paris (1929), Paramount on Parade (1930), Playboy of Paris (1930), The Little Cafe (1931), One Hour with You (1932), A Bedtime Story (1933) and Man About Town (1939) — just to name a handful. Maurice Chevalier introduced many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin in films and these songs went on to become standards including “Louise,” “My Ideal” and “One Hour with You”  —  just to name a few.  Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Maurice Chevalier singing his signature song “Louise” from Innocents of Paris.

 

 

Friday, September 9, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic Michael Bublé! Today, we celebrate this pop icon who is a classic jazz and soul singer songwriter and a Grammy winning singer from Canada whose style is inspired by in his own words “my idols” the likes of famed artists including Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Tony Bennett and Stevie Wonder. Bublé covered the classic song penned by Songwriter Leo Robin — “Thanks for the Memory” — when Michael Buble and John Shorthouse (the voice of the Vancouver Canucks) were paying tribute to Tommy Larchield (the broadcaster of the Vancouver Canucks for 30 years) after retiring at the concert in Vancouver. This song was introduced in the 1938 film The Big Broadcast of 1938 where it was first sung sentimentally by Bob hope and Shirley Ross. For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Bublé paying tribute by singing a playful version of — “Thanks for the Memory.”

 

 

Wednesday, September 7, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary Michael Feinstein! He is a singer, pianist, and music revivalist. Feinstein is also a multi-platinum-selling, five-time Grammy-nominated recording artist and, in 1988, he won a Drama Desk Special Award for celebrating American musical theatre songs. He currently serves as Artistic Director for The Center for the Performing Arts in Carmel, Indiana. Today, we celebrate this legend who is most famous as an interpreter of, and an anthropologist, archivist and his genuine love for the repertoire known as the Great American Songbook. Michael recorded many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “Hooray for Love,” “I’m Just a Little Girl from Little Rock” and “Thanks for the Memory” — just to name a few. For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Michael singing “Love Is Just around the Corner.”

 


Wednesday, September 7, 2016 Today is a day of pride in Brazil with the celebration of Independence Day of Brazil, commonly called Sete de Setembro (September 7th). We wish the Brazilians a Happy Sete de Setembro. This is a national holiday observed in Brazil on September 7 of every year marked by patriotic displays in most Brazilian cities. In New York City, the Brazilian Day is celebrated with an event held annually, taking place at 46th Street, near Times Square, in Manhattan. The Brazilian Day concert is the centerpiece of the event, featuring famous Brazilian musicians. Similar events are held abroad in Deerfield Beach, San Diego, Los Angeles, Toronto, and London. This makes us remember the 1943 musical The Gang’s All Here with a dazzling Leo Robin & Harry Warren score with musical numbers that are lively and entertaining like “The Lady in the Tutti Frutti Hat” and “You Discover You’re in New York.”  For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Aloysio De Oliveira singing Brazil (music written by Ary Barroso) and Carmen Miranda singing “You Discover You’re in New York.”

 

Monday, September 6, 2016 The summer’s almost over but with Labor Day weekend there is still time to enjoy a movie. On this fun-loving holiday, you may want to consider Woody Allen’s recently released nostalgia-sodden romance “Cafe Society.” In Matias Bombal’s Hollywood, film critic Matias Antonio Bombal reviewed Woody Allen’s Cafe Society, a story taking place in the 1930s Hollywood. Bombal praises that “the entire soundtrack is joyfully filled with the exquisite musical taste of Woody Allen.” He is particularly fond of the “scene with Ralph Rainger and Leo Robin’s 1934 song “June in January” (for) adding just the right support to finish the total effect of the moment. It occurs as Bobby gets to know Veronica one late evening in a jazz club in New York.”  For your enjoyment, here is Matias Bombal’s Hollywood review along with this wonderful scene:

 

Sunday, September 4, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic Beyoncé! Today, we celebrate this pop icon who is a singer, songwriter, record producer and actress. She rose to fame in the late 1990s as lead singer of R&B girl-group Destiny’s Child. Her combined record sales of over 160 million as a solo artist and with Destiny’s Child makes her one of the best-selling music artists of all time. Beyoncé covered the classic song penned by Songwriter Leo Robin — “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” — for Giorgio Armani’s new fragrance Emporio Armani Diamonds in an ad directed by Jake Nava and titled “Can You Resist?” This song was introduced in the 1949 Broadway show Gentlemen Prefer Blondes where it was first sung by Carol Channing and later reprised by Marilyn Monroe in the 1953 film of the same name. For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Beyoncé singing the iconic song — “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend.”

 

Saturday, September 3, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary Kitty Carlisle! Kitty was an American singer, actress and spokeswoman for the arts, serving 20 years on the New York State Council on the Arts and receiving the National Medal of Arts in 1991. Today, we celebrate this legend who is best remembered as a regular panelist on the television game show To Tell the Truth. Carlisle’s early movies included two films with Bing Crosby with musical scores by Leo Robin — She Loves Me Not (1934) and Here Is My Heart (1934). Kitty recorded many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “Love Is Just around the Corner” and “With Every Breath I Take” from Here Is My Heart and the patriotic song “Uncle Sam Gets Around” from Cadet Girl —  just to name a few. What wonderful memories. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Kitty and Bing singing “Love in Bloom” in She Loves Me Not.

 

Wednesday August 31, 2016 With the wonderful summertime, we hope everyone is having a safe and enjoyable time! Thinking of summer camp invokes memories of long days spent outside in the sun and cool evenings singing around a warm campfire. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical movie moment of Bing Crosby singing “The Live Oak Tree” along with the girls’ chorus from Just For You.

 

 

Sunday, August 28, 2016 “I Kissed A Girl” is Katy Perry’s 2008 hit song that she describes the lyrics as being “about the magical beauty of a woman.” The allure of kissing a girl was captured in many performances since then by songstresses including when Madonna kissed Britney Spears at the 2003 MTV Video Music Awards (The French Kiss) and then Madonna kissed Christina Aguilera too (The Peck); Rihanna and Britney Spears Kiss at the 2011 Billboard Music Awards (The Peck); Taylor Swift Kisses Selena Gomez at the 2015 MTV Video Music Awards (The Cheek Kiss); Ariana Grande And Liz Gillies accidentally kiss during their hangout (The Smooch); and Miley Cyrus kisses Katy Perry at her concert at the Staples Center (The Pull Away Kiss), afterwards, the classy Katy Perry referred to it as “a friendly girly kiss, you know, as us girls do.”

This makes us remember the 1930 romance drama Morocco directed by Josef von Sternberg and starring Gary Cooper with music written by lyricist ‪‎Leo Robin‬ & composer Karl Hajos with titillating musical numbers that are alluring and entertaining like “Give Me the Man.” The fireworks girl’s insight is spot on as these girly kisses are tantalizing to everyone of every sex like it should be. For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of all these songstresses’ kisses along with a glamorous actress singing “Give Me the Man” in a famous and scandalous scene from Morocco. 

 

 

Sunday, August 21, 2016, Happy Birthday to the iconic Kenny Rogers! Today, we celebrate this pop icon who is a singer, songwriter, actor and record producer.  Kenney is one of the best-selling music artists of all time with over 120 million records worldwide with hit singles across various music genres. He has been most successful with country audiences and is a member of the Country Music Hall of  Fame. Kenny recorded an album of jazz standards (from the 1930s and 40s) with David Foster called “Timepiece” where he recorded, with Take 6 providing vocals, the classic song penned by Songwriter Leo Robin — “Love Is Just around the Corner.” This song was introduced in the 1934 film Here is My Heart where it was first sung by Bing Crosby and Kitty Carlisle. The song has since become a favorite and has been recorded by many artists including crooners Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and jazz pianist Earl Hines. For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Kenny, with vocals by the gospel group Take 6, singing the jazz standard — “Love Is Just around the Corner.” 

 

Sunday, August 21, 2016 Today, we celebrate the 57th anniversary of the statehood of Hawaii, the 50th and most recent state of the United States of America. Hawaii is the only U.S. state located in Oceania, not located in the Americas  and the only one composed entirely of islands. Hawaii’s diverse natural scenery, warm tropical climate, abundance of public beaches, oceanic surroundings, and active volcanoes make it a popular destination for tourists. “Blue Hawaii,” a popular song written by Leo Robin and Ralph Rainger for the 1937 Paramount Pictures film Waikiki Wedding, starring Bing Crosby and Shirley Ross, captures these islands of paradise. The song subsequently received numerous cover versions, most successfully as the title track of the 1961 Elvis Presley film, the soundtrack of which stayed at #1 on the album chart for twenty consecutive weeks. For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Elvis Presley singing “Blue Hawaii.” 

 

Thursday, August 18, 2016 With the wonderful 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil coming to a close, the World Athletes have performed magnificently with many memorable moments and the Team USA has brought home the gold with the highest medal count. Though famous for its outdoors scenery with its majestic mountains and beautiful beaches in sunny Rio, the activities can seem countless but what will the athletes, visitors and natives do if it rains? This makes us remember the 1946 musical “The Time, the Place and the Girl” with a sparkling Leo Robin & Arthur Schwartz score with musical numbers that are lively and entertaining like “A Rainy Night in Rio.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Bing Crosby singing “A Rainy Night in Rio” with beautiful majestic scenes from the 2016 Olympic Games.

 

Tuesday, August 16, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic Bill Evans! Today, we celebrate this legend who was an influential jazz pianist and composer who mostly worked in a trio setting. His use of impressionist harmony, inventive interpretation of traditional jazz repertoire, block chords, and trademark rhythmically independent, singing melodic lines continue to influence jazz pianists today. Evans’ repertoire consisted of both jazz standards and original compositions of which many were dedicated to people close to him. Evans performed many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “Easy Living,” “In Love in Vain” and “Up with the Lark” — just to name a few. What wonderful memories. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Evans performing the jazz standard that he took with him around the world to play and make it his own — “Up with the Lark.”

 

Tuesday, August 16, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic Madonna! Today, we celebrate this pop icon who is a singer, songwriter, dancer, actress, and businesswoman and has become the “Queen of Pop” with the distinction of the greatest influence on other artists. Madonna is recognized as the best-selling female recording artist of all time and she achieved popularity by pushing the boundaries of lyrical content in mainstream popular music and imagery in her music videos, which became a fixture on MTV. In her recent Rebel Heart Tour, Madonna sings this classic song penned by Songwriter Leo Robin — “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Madonna doing a sing-a-long version with the audience of “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend.”

 

Thursday, August 8, 2016 After an incredible ceremony in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil at the opening of the Olympic Games, we wish every athlete good luck on their quests for gold, especially the Athletes from Team USA! Though famous for its outdoors scenery with its majestic mountains and beautiful beaches in sunny Rio, the activities can can seem countless but what will the athletes, visitors and natives do if it rains? This makes us remember the 1946 musical “The Time, the Place and the Girl” with a sparkling Leo Robin & Arthur Schwartz score with musical numbers that are lively and entertaining like “A Rainy Night in Rio.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Dinah Shore singing “A Rainy Night in Rio” with beautiful majestic scenery.

 

Wednesday, August 10, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary Jack Haley! Today, we celebrate this legendary actor who started as a vaudevillian song-and-dance comedian and who will always be remembered for his portrayal of the Tin Man in the classic 1939 MGM film The Wizard of Oz. Jack was born in Boston, Massachusetts to Canadian-born parents. After The Wizard of Oz., he co-starred in Moon Over Miami, a 1941 musical film directed by Walter Lang, with Betty Grable and Don Ameche in leading roles and co-starring Robert Cummings, Carole Landis and Charlotte Greenwood with a memorable lyrical score by Leo Robin including “Loveliness and Love” and “You Started Something.” What wonderful memories. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of the cast in Moon Over Miami.

 

 

Saturday, August 6, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic Lucille Ball! Today, we celebrate this legend who was an actress, comedian, model, film-studio executive and producer and who was best known as the star of the self-produced sitcoms I Love Lucy, The Lucy–Desi Comedy Hour, The Lucy Show, Here’s Lucy, and Life with Lucy. What wonderful memories. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory. “For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Lucille Ball with husband Desi Arnaz in the last scene from the 1956 episode of “I Love Lucy” called “Lucy Meets Bob Hope” where they all sing Bob Hope’s theme song — “Thanks for the Memory.”

 

Wednesday, August 3, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic Tony Bennett! Today, we celebrate this legend who is a jazz vocalist and who is best known for performing standards and his signature song, “I Left My Heart in San Francisco.” Tony recorded many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “Beyond the “For Every Man There’s a Woman,” “It Was Written in the Stars,” “Louise,” “My Heart Won’t Say Goodbye” and “My Ideal”  —  just to name a handful. What wonderful memories. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Tony singing a jazz standard — “True Blue Lou.” 

 

 

Friday, July 29, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary composer Sigmund Romberg! Today, we celebrate this Austro-Hungarian composer who is best known for his musicals and operettas, particularly The Student Prince (1924), The Desert Song (1926) and The New Moon (1928).  Early in his career, Romberg was employed by the Shubert brothers to write music for their musicals and revues, including several vehicles for Al Jolson. For the Shuberts, he also adapted several European operettas for American audiences. Sigmund Romberg’s posthumous The Girl in Pink Tights (1954), a musical comedy with music by Sigmund Romberg and lyrics by Leo Robin. which starred French ballerina, Jeanmarie, introduced a couple of hit songs — “Lost in Loveliness” and “My Heart Won’t Say Goodbye.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of recordings by both Johnny Mathis and Doris Day of the romantic ballad — “Lost in Loveliness.”

 

Tuesday, July 26, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary comedian Grace Allen! Today, we celebrate this megastar who is best remembered for the zany partner and comic foil of husband and “straight man” George Burns. These legends were born of their vaudeville routine and carried over to both radio and television. As the show wrapped up Burns would look at Allen and say “Say good night, Gracie” to which she would usually simply reply “Good night.” Popular legend has it that Allen would say, “Good night, Gracie.” Songwriter Leo Robin and the comedy duo worked together in a great many films including The Big Broadcast (1932), College Humor (1933), International House (1933), Six of a Kind (1934), We’re Not Dressing (1934), Love in Bloom(1935), Here Comes Cookie (1935), The Big Broadcast of 1936 (1935), College Holiday (1936) and The Big Broadcast of 1937 (1936) — just to name ten. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Gracie performing a hilarious version of Leo Robin’s song “Vamp of the Pampas” in Here Comes Cookie.

 

Monday, July 25, 2016 Seventy years ago today, the legendary comedy team “Martin and Lewis,”comprising singer Dean Martin and comedian Jerry Lewis, debuted at Atlantic City’s 500 Club on July 25, 1946. Today, we celebrate this comedy duo who met in 1945 at the Glass Hat Club inNew York, where both men were performing. Before they teamed up, Martin was a nightclub singer, while Lewis did a comedy act lip-synching to records. They performed in nightclubs, and, starting in 1949, on radio. Later they branched out into television and films. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment from 1951 of “Martin and Lewis” in the film The Stooge with Lewis doing an impression of Maurice Chevalier singing a Leo Robin song “Louise” and Dino singing “Louise” at a nightclub.

 

 

Saturday, July 23, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary singer-actress Gloria DeHaven! Today, we celebrate this film star who is best remembered for playing herself in Three Little Words, a 1950 American musical film biography of the Tin Pan Alley songwriting partnership of Kalmar and Ruby, where she sang “Who’s Sorry Now?” How lucky someone can be to play themselves and look so gorgeous and sing so beautifully! In another musical the following year, Two Tickets to Broadway, she sang a couple of numbers with lyrics written by Leo Robin including “Let the Worry Bird Worry for You” and “The Closer You Are.” She also recorded Leo Robin’s “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend.” Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Gloria DeHaven singin’ and dancin’ “Let the Worry Bird Worry for You.”

 

 

Friday, July 22, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary singer Margaret Whiting! Today, we celebrate this pop icon who will always be remembered for her clear and sweet voice, tinged with innocence who sold millions of records in the 1940s and ’50s with sentimental ballads. She was the daughter of Richard Whiting, a prolific composer who wrote music with lyricist Leo Robin. “My Ideal,” written by Whiting and Robin, was the first song recorded by Margaret and she made it her own theme song. Margaret recorded many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including  “My Ideal,” “In Love in Vain,” “Oh, but I Do!” “One Hour with You,” “What’s Good about Goodbye?” and “With Every Breath I Take” — just to name a handful. What wonderful memories. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Margaret singing “My Ideal.”

 

 

Wednesday, July 20, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic actress Natalie Wood! Today, we celebrate this film star who is known for her screen roles in Miracle on 34th Street, Splendor in the Grass, Rebel Without a Cause, The Searchers, and West Side Story. She first worked in films as a child, then became a successful Hollywood star as a young adult, receiving three Academy Award nominations before she was 25 years old. A very young Natalie Wood played the daughter of Bing Crosby in the film Just for You in 1952. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Bing Crosby singing “On the Ten:Ten from Ten-Tennessee,” an old vaudeville song for the trustees, causing his daughter, played by Natalie Wood, great embarrassment in Just for You.
 
 

 

Monday, July 18, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary actress Lupe Vélez! Today, we celebrate this film star who began her career as a performer in Mexican vaudeville in the early 1920s and became one of the first successful Latin American actresses. After moving to the United States, she appeared in the last years of American silent films and progressed to leading roles in numerous movies including, in 1929, with co-star Gary Cooper in Wolf Song. Vélez’s personal life was as colorful as her screen persona and the Mexican Spitfire film series was created to capitalize on her well known fiery personality for which she was nicknamed The Mexican Spitfire. In Wolf Song, she sang a couple of numbers — with music by Richard Whiting and lyrics by Leo Robin — “My Honey, Fare Thee Well” and “Wolf Song.” It has been rumored that Russ Columbo dubbed Gary Cooper’s singing voice. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Lupe Vélez singing “My Honey, Fare Thee Well.”

 

 

Tuesday July 12, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary songwriter Oscar Hammerstein ll! Today, we celebrate this lyricist and playwright who is best known for his collaborations with Richard Rodgers, which include Oklahoma!, Carousel, South Pacific, The King and I, and The Sound of Music and Jerome Kern, with whom he wrote Show Boat.

During World War ll, the Music War Council was organized by the music industry to make a contribution to the war effort. Oscar, who represented the East Coast branch, (aka The New York Organization) worked with fellow songwriter Leo Robin, who represented the West Coast branch (aka The Hollywood Office) in the search for songs to support the war effort. Some of the other songwriters who participated from The Hollywood Office included Harold Arlen, Sammy Cahn, Ira Gershwin and Jule Styne.

Leo Robin wrote lyrics for many ‘war songs’ including “Uncle Sam Gets Around,” for recordings by singers including Kitty Carlisle and which appeared in the 1941 film, Cadet Girl and “I’m Saving a Dime Out of Every Dollar,” for the benefit of the Treasury Department and the theme song “You’re So Sweet to Remember” for the 1944 film Winged Victory, a joint effort of 20th Century Fox and the U.S. Army Air Forces — just to name a few. For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Betty Grable singing a couple of war songs with lyrics by Leo Robin from A Yank in the R.A.F.— “Hi-Ya Love” and “Another Little Dream Won’t Do Us Any Harm.”

 

 

Thursday July 7, 2016  Seventy-nine years ago today, we celebrate the release of this film from 1937 — Easy Living! This wonderful film is a Paramount screwball comedy, directed by Mitchell Leisen, written by Preston Sturges from a story by Vera Caspary, and starring Jean Arthur, Edward Arnold, and Ray Milland. Leo Robin wrote the lyrics and Ralph Rainger composed the music for the song “Easy Living” for the film. This was the film’s only song and it was only performed instrumentally in the original film. “Easy Living” since has become a jazz standard, made famous by Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald and many other jazz and pop singers including Bill Evans and Norah Jones. “Easy Living” is a jazz ballad with good feeling lyrics and has been featured in many films including Clint Eastwood’s 1995 critically acclaimed The Bridges of Madison County and Todd Hayne’s 2015 Academy Award-nominee Carol. For your enjoyment, here is the hilarious classic automat scene with the song “Easy Living” from the film of the same name.

 

 

Wednesday July 6, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary actress Janet Leigh! Today, we celebrate this film star who is best remembered for her shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s classic thriller, Psycho. Throughout the 1950s, she tackled a wide variety of film genres and worked with many leading stars including third husband Tony Curtis in five films. She proved versatile starring in musicals with roles with lyrics written by Leo Robin including “The Worry Bird” from the 1951 film Two Tickets to Broadway and “There’s Nothin’ Like Love” and “Give Me A Band And My Baby” from the 1955 film My Sister Eileen where she played the title role. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Janet Leigh singin’ and dancin’ “There’s Nothin’ Like Love” in My Sister Eileen.
 
 

 

Monday, July 4, 2016 We wish everyone a Happy 4th of July! Today, we celebrate the land of the free and the home of the brave as we enjoy the freedoms for which our forbearers fought so mightily. On this special day of festivities, for your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of the celebratory song from the smash hit, Hit the Deck —  “Hallelujah.”
 
 

 

Wednesday, June 29, 2016 Happy Birthday to pop icon Nicole Scherzinger! Today, we celebrate this pop star who is a recording artist, songwriter, actress, and television personality. Nicole rose to fame as the lead singer of the burlesque troupe turned-recording act, the Pussycat Dolls becoming one of the world’s best-selling girl groups of all time. During this stage of her meteoric rise in her career, Nicole performed a version of  “Diamonds Are A Girl’s Best Friend,” the famous song penned by Leo Robin, for the 2007 CBS special, Movies Rock, which paid tribute to the strong relationship between films and music. For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Nicole performing the song — “Diamonds Are A Girl’s Best Friend.”

 

 

Sunday, June 26, 2016 Happy Birthday to sitcom-star-turned pop music sensation Ariana Grande! Today, we celebrate this pop star who is an actress, singer and dancer and who rose to fame for her role as Cat Valentine on Nickelodeon’s Victorious. The songstress then rose to music stardom with numerous hit songs including “Problem,” “Bang Bang” and “Love Me Harder.” Grande took her love for movies to the stage by performing her sultry, new song “Dangerous Woman” at the MTV Movie Awards by channeling her inner Marilyn Monroe. She paid tribute to Monroe’s famous pink dress and diamond necklace look in the film Gentlemen Prefer Blondes where she sang “Diamonds are a Girl’s Best Friend,” the iconic song penned by Leo Robin. For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Grande channeling her inner Marilyn Monroe.

 

 

Sunday, June 26, 2016 Happy Birthday to sitcom-star-turned pop music sensation Ariana Grande! Today, we celebrate this pop star who is an actress, singer and dancer. This superstar has become known for her great musical impressions by singing female artists including Rihanna, Shakira, and Celine Dion. In a Saturday Night Live sketch, Grande who hosted the show, did get to perform some great impressions but her great Judy Garland act was actually cut from Saturday Night Live show. It’s too bad this sketch wasn’t included because she really did a spot on impression of the iconic Judy Garland. The songs in this Judy Garland sketch, known as Up We Go In Our Fantastic Rocket are reminiscent of the songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin with lyrics about romance, journeys, rockets and stars that Judy Garland recorded including “Beyond the Blue Horizon,” “Hooray for Love,” and “Journey to a Star” — just to name a few. While this hilarious Judy Garland impression unfortunately didn’t make it to air, we have it here for your enjoyment — a magical musical moment of Ariana Grande channeling her inner Judy Garland.

 

 

Tuesday, June 21, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary Jane Russell! Today, we celebrate this legendary star whose talents as a dramatic actress and musical performer along with being one of Hollywood’s leading sex symbols in the 1940s and 1950s made her a great star on the Silver Screen. The sultry actress was never better than when she played Dorothy Shaw in the hit film Gentlemen Prefer Blondes opposite Marilyn Monroe where they sang memorable songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin from the score including “Bye Bye, Baby” and “I’m Just a Little Girl from Little Rock. A year before, in Macao, a black-and-white film noir adventure, she belts out a few torch songs written by Leo Robin, as well. What wonderful memories. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment from Macao of Jane singing the torch song “You Kill Me.”

 

Monday, June 20, 2016 Happy Birthday to pop icon Nicole Mary Kidman! Today, we celebrate this pop superstar who is an is an Australian-American actress and film producer who is primarily known in the field of acting and entered the music industry in the 2000s after she starred in the role of Satine, the fictional star performer of the famous Moulin Rouge nightclub in Paris, at the turn of the 20th century, in the movie of the same name as the nightclub. Her performance in the 2001 musical Moulin Rouge! earned her a second Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy and her first nomination for the Academy Award for Best Actress. The song “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” is featured in the film Moulin Rouge!, in which it is sung principally by Nicole Kidman. What wonderful memories. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment from the film Moulin Rouge! of Nicole performing the song — “Diamonds Are A Girl’s Best Friend.” 

 

 

Saturday, June 18, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic singer-actress Jeanette MacDonald! Today, we celebrate this legend who will always be remembered for her operatic soprano voice and her musical films of the 1930s where she starred with Maurice Chevalier. Leo Robin was one of the most influential songwriters who helped shape the careers of many of Hollywood’s greatest stars especially during their early years including Jeanette MacDonald and Maurice Chevalier. In the first rush of sound films where Leo Robin wrote the lyrics, Jenni starred in many of them including The Vagabond King (1930), Monte Carlo (1930), Paramount on Parade (1930) and One Hour with You (1932). Prior to this rush, Jenni and Leo worked together on the Broadway show Bubbling Over (1926).

In these films, Jenni, also known as “The Iron Butterfly,” introduced many songs penned by Leo Robin and they became part of The Great American Songbook including “Beyond the Blue Horizon” and “Always in All Ways” from Monte Carlo and “One Hour With You” from the film with the same name — just to name a few. What wonderful memories. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment from Monte Carlo with director Ernest Lubitsch’s famous train scene with Jenni singing “Beyond the Blue Horizon.”

 

 

Wednesday, June 15, 2016 Happy Birthday to the pop icon composer and orchestra leader David Rose! Today, we celebrate this legend who will always be remembered for his most famous composition, “The Stripper”. Ironically, it was originally used as the B-side to his single, “Ebb Tide”.  This song is not to be confused with the title song from the movie “Ebb Tide” (1937), which is a composition by Leo Robin and Ralph Rainger. In addition, the theme music that he wrote for “Bonanza” and “Little House on the Prairie” have been regarded as some of the finest in television history especially with their influence on Western style scoring.

During World War II, he served as a composer and conductor for the U. S. Army and he collaborated with lyricist Leo Robin on many songs and they wrote the Oscar nominated song “So-o-o-o-o in Love” that was featured in the film Wonder Man. While on the subject of a love song, he was married for a few years to the legendary Judy Garland. What wonderful memories. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of the dazzling dance number “So-o-o-o-o in Love” from the Wonder Man.

 

 

Tuesday, June 14, 2016 In the spirit of patriotism on this Flag Day and National Flag Week, many people in the United States honor this day by displaying the American flag at homes and public buildings. Flag Day is a time when Americans reflect on the foundations of the nation’s freedom. The flag of the United States represents freedom and has been an enduring symbol of the country’s ideals since its early days. On the same day, the United States Army celebrates its birthday.
 
We also remember on June 12, 1943 when Franklin D. Roosevelt declared that “Entertainment is always a national asset. Invaluable in times of peace, it is indispensable in wartime. All those who are working in the entertainment industry are building and maintaining national morale both on the battlefront and on the home front.” Artists, entertainers and schools pitched in to support the bond effort. For example, The Hollywood Bond Cavalcade, was a traveling variety show featuring the likes of Judy Garland, Lucille Ball and Mickey Rooney.
 
 Celebrities like Bob Hope, Frank Sinatra, Marlene Dietrich and Bette Davis, traveled the country putting on live shows or radio programs promoting War Bond sales. Here is a memorable moment of a classic World War II Savings Bond promo introduced by Bob Hope and starring a number of the wonderful female stars and pinup girls of the early 1940s with the song penned by Leo Robin — “Thanks for  the Memory.”
 
 
 

Friday, June 10, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic Judy Garland! Today, we celebrate this legend who will always be remembered for her role as Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz (1939) where she sang the song for which she would forever be known, “Over the Rainbow” and her role as Esther in Meet Me in St. Louis(1944) where she introduced “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas.” Judy Garland recorded many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “Beyond the Blue Horizon,” “Hooray for Love,””Journey to a Star,” “No Love, No Nothin,'”  and  “Thanks for the Memory.” —  just to name a handful. What wonderful memories. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Judy Garland singing her theatrical version of “Thanks for the Memory.”

 

 

Tuesday, June 7, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic entertainer Dean Martin! Today, we celebrate and remember him as the “King Of Cool,” his nickname, for his seemingly effortless charisma and self-assurance. He will always be remembered for being the straight man of the exceptional comedy team “Martin and Lewis” and for being a member of the “Rat Pack.” He was a star on television too, for two decades, as the host of the television variety program The Dean Martin Show and The Dean Martin Celebrity Roast. Dino recorded many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “Louise,” “Love Is Just around the Corner” and “Please” — just to name a few. What wonderful memories. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Dino singing the song, “It’s June in January.”
 
 

 

Wednesday, June 1, 2016 Happy Birthday to the iconic Marilyn Monroe! Today, we celebrate this legendary star who will always be remembered for her role as Lorelei Lee in the 1953 film adaptation of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes where she sang the song for which she would forever be known — “Diamonds Are A Girl’s Best Friend.” Marilyn Monroe sang memorable songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin from the score for Gentlemen Prefer Blondes including “Bye Bye, Baby,” “I’m Just a Little Girl from Little Rock” and, of course, “Diamonds Are A Girl’s Best Friend. What wonderful memories. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Marilyn Monroe entertaining the troops on stage in Korea in February 1954 where she sang a medley of Robin and Gershwin songs — “Diamonds Are A Girl’s Best Friend,” ” Bye Bye, Baby” and “Do It Again.”

 

 

Monday, May 30, 2016  On this Memorial Day, we salute the men and women of the armed forces and we remember and honor those who risked their lives to protect us and the country. In a 1944 drama film, Winged Victory, five friends go through the training process to become pilots, facing success, failure, and tragedy. This film was a joint effort of 20th Century Fox and the U.S. Army Air Forces where all profits from this picture went to Army charities.Songwriter Leo Robin wrote the lyrics for the theme song for this film — “You’re So Sweet to Remember” whose meaning represent the sentiment for those that are apart while protecting our country. Here is that song of hope.
 

 

Sunday, May 29, 2016 Happy Birthday to John F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States! This day can be a bittersweet day. It is a special day as we remember his iconic Presidency but for those of us who remember his assassination when his life and Presidency were tragically cut short, it can be a painful reminder. Jacqueline Kennedy revealed Jack Kennedy’s affection for the contemporary Broadway musical by Alan Jay Lerner  — “Camelot.” The term “Camelot” came to represent the iconic Kennedy Presidency with the charisma of him and his family. To this day, Camelot is used to describe theidealism, romance, and tragedy of the Kennedy era. Here is a memorable musical moment on May 19, 1962 at a large party inMadison Square Garden of Marilyn Monroe singing “Happy Birthday, Mr. President” and the classic song written by Leo Robin — “Thanks for the Memory,” for which she had written special lyrics for JFK.

 

 

Sunday, May 29, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary Bob Hope! Today, we celebrate this megastar who will always be remembered for a career spanning nearly 80 years for doing it all including as a comedian, vaudevillian, actor, television host, singer, dancer, athlete and author. And he was declared an honorary veteran of the United States Armed Forces in 1997 by act of the U.S. Congress after his long career performing USO shows to entertain active service American military personnel. The 1938 Oscar-winning song, penned by Leo Robin, “Thanks for the Memory,” sung by Bob Hope in the film The Big Broadcast of 1938, became forever Hope’s signature song. Where ever Bob Hope would go the song was ever-present with him. For your enjoyment, here is a memorable musical moment of Bob Hope singing “Thanks for the Memory” as a tribute to the military personnel and the country after receiving a special honor from President John F. Kennedy in September 1963 and Nancy Reagan singing the same song to him on Hope’s 85th Birthday in May 1988.

 

 

Saturday, May 28, 2016 Happy Birthday to pop icon Kylie Ann Minogue! Today, we celebrate this pop star who is an Australian-born singer, songwriter, and actress and known for her signature contemporary disco music. The “Princess of Pop,” a nickname for Kylie, has performed “Diamonds Are A Girl’s Best Friend,” the famous song penned by Leo Robin, on many occasions. The “Goddess of Pop,” another nickname, does not just sing the song but she performs the song with her theatrical dance routine. Kylie performed this song in 1995. She also performed the song in 1999 as a tribute to and dressed as Marilyn Monroe for the opening of 20th Century Fox’s Australian Studios. In 2007 she recorded another version for her homecoming film White Diamond. For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Kylie performing the song — “Diamonds Are A Girl’s Best Friend.”

 

 

Monday, May 23, 2016 Happy Birthday to pop icon Rosemary Clooney! Today, we celebrate and remember Rosie who was known for her deep, rich, and smooth voice. Frank Sinatra eloquently stated “Rosemary Clooney has that great talent which exudes warmth and feeling in every song she sings…”  Rosemary Clooney recorded many songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “Easy Living,”  “Hooray for Love,” “No Love, No Nothin,'”  “Zing a Little Zong,” and  “Thanks for the Memory.” —  just to name a handful. What wonderful memories. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Rosemary Clooney singing songs from The Leo Robin Songbook.

 

 

Wednesday, May 18, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary singer Perry Como! Today, we celebrate and remember him on television relaxed in his signature cardigan sweater with his warm, smooth, easy-listening voice and as a wholesome nice-guy and family-man. Perry Como recorded several songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “Prisoner of Love,”  “Faithful Forever” and “No Love, No Nothin'”  — just to name a few. What wonderful memories. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Perry Como singing the song, “Prisoner of Love”.

 

 

May 14, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary singer Bobby Darin! Today, we celebrate and remember this versatile entertainer who mastered many music genres — folk, country, pop and jazz — and who played many musical instruments — piano, drums, guitar, harmonica and xylophone. Bobby Darin recorded several songs penned by Songwriter Leo Robin including “Easy Living,” “In Love in Vain” and “My Cutey’s Due at Two-to-Two Today” — just to name a few. What wonderful memories. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical moment of Bobby Darin singing with Judy Garland the song, “Beyond the Blue Horizon” and singing with Johnny Mercer the tune, “My Cutey’s Due At Two-To-Two Today.”

 


 
 

Sunday, May 8, 2016 Happy Mother’s Day to everyone!  We all have fond memories of our Moms and Mothers! Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical movie moment of Martha Raye singing “Mama That Moon Is Here Again” from The Big Broadcast of 1938.


 

May 7, 2016 Happy Birthday to the legendary Gary Cooper! Today, we celebrate and remember this superstar who was known for his natural, authentic style on the Silver Screen. Songwriter Leo Robin wrote lyrics for many Gary Cooper movies where Gary sang or was mesmerized by the singing of his co-star including in Alice in Wonderland,  Desire,Morocco, Paramount on Parade, and The Wolf Song — just to name a handful. What wonderful memories. Leo Robin’s iconic song says it best — “Thanks for the Memory.” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical movie moment of love-struck Gary Cooper captivated by leading lady Marlene Dietrich singing “Awake in a Dream” from Desire.
 
 
 

Thursday, May 5, 2016 Happy Cinco de Mayo to all our Hispanic friends from around the world! Cinco de Mayo has come to represent a celebration of the contributions that Mexican Americans and all Hispanics have made to America. We celebrate this special day with the remembrance of contributions by many Hispanic film stars who Songwriter Leo Robin wrote lyrics for. For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical movie moment of Brazilian Carmen Miranda singing “The Lady in the Tutti Frutti Hat” from The Gang’s All Here.

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Tuesday, May 3, 2016   Happy Birthday to the legendary Bing Crosby! .” For your enjoyment, here is a magical musical movie moment of Bing singing  “It’s June in January”  from  Here Is My Heart.  


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